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Tag: MIL STD 461

  1. The RE102 test method in MIL-STD-461E required using a 41” rod antenna below 30 MHz with the counterpoise grounded to the ground plane, which called into question the accuracy of the measurement results above the 10 MHz frequency range. To address this, MIL-STD-461F requires that the counterpoise be isolated from the groundplane.
Published in MultiPoint Blog

Although commercial off the shelf (COTS) products are not typically designed for use in military electromagnetic environments (EME), manufacturers are attempting to integrate them into other products for use in military EME。 This quickly growing trend has increased for several reasons; the most compelling are cost-savings and miniaturization and modularization of COTS products。 While this trend has been a welcome development for manufacturers of military solutions with integrated COTS products, demonstrating their compliance with the stringent DoD military standards is fraught with challenges。

Published in MultiPoint Blog

Rhein Tech Laboratories, Inc. is hosting a complimentary learning opportunity on October 22nd at our Herndon, Virginia location.  The Rohde and Schwarz mobile classroom will be parked at our facility where subject expert Ken Javor will teach a MIL-STD-461/464 class including a brief overview of the MIL-STD-461/464 test requirements with a historical perspective of the testing, and how it has evolved to meet the modern challenges of defense electronics testing and integration.  Additionally, the class will provide insight into the direction of future proposed MIL-STD changes, along with some initial insight to test correlation of the results.  Additionally, there will be hands-on opportunities with the latest test equipment. The class is limited to 24 students.  Please register by October 8th.

Published in MultiPoint Blog

A client recently inquired as to whether it would be possible to see a reduction in radiated spurious emission levels on Spread Spectrum Clock (SSC) fundamental frequency and harmonics using Peak Detectors during MIL-STD-461F testing of a COTS product, when previous FCC Part 15 testing of the COTS product proved compliance using Quasi-Peak Detectors. We are pleased to share our response: If COTS with SSC products with Part 15 compliant fundamental frequencies and harmonics are tested to MIL-STD-461F using required Peak Detectors, the spectral peaks of their fundamental frequencies and harmonics should comply with MIL-STD-461F, provided the SSC timing parameters are properly configured. A properly configured SSC would produce lower spectral peaks of the fundamental frequency and harmonics in the SSC mode than the spectral peaks of the fundamental frequency and harmonics in the non-SSC mode by levels that are dependent on the manufacturer of the SSC, modulating waveform profile, modulation rate used to modulate the fundamental frequency clock frequency in the SSC mode, spreading rate style used (down, center or up) as depicted using (Δ) in Figure 1 below:

 
Published in MultiPoint Blog

Rhein Tech Laboratories, Inc. is pleased to share a response we provided to a client’s recent request for an explanation of the measurement detector requirements in MIL-STD-461F product testing. MIL-STD-461F requires peak detectors for all product testing. MIL-STD-461F, paragraph A.5.1.1 (5.1.1) Units of frequency domain measurements states: “All frequency domain limits are expressed in terms of equivalent Root Mean Square (RMS) value of a sine wave as would be indicated by the output of a measurement receiver using peak envelope detection.”

Published in MultiPoint Blog

Recently, a client contacted Rhein Tech Laboratories, Inc. about requirements for Electromagnetic Interference Test Procedure (EMITP) in MIL-STD-461F product testing. We are pleased to share our response below. The MIL-STD 461F standard requires that a product be tested and evaluated, taking into consideration its unique functional characteristics and operational environment

Published in MultiPoint Blog

Calculating a Radar’s Maximum Range

Posted on February 28th 2020

How does one calculate a radar’s maximum range (Rmax), if it is a C band with 2.5MW peak transmit power (Pt), operating at 5.8GHz with an antenna gain (G) = 40dBi and an effective temperature (Te) = 290K, and its pulse width (?) = 0.25 ?sec? The radar’s minimum threshold is (SNRmin)= 25dB, and we assume its Radar Cross Section (RCS) (?) = 0.15m2 and its Noise Figure (F) = 3 dB. To determine the radar’s maximum range (Rmax) we must first calculate its bandwidth (B) and wavelength (?) using equation 1 and equation 2 below.

Published in MultiPoint Blog

Submersible cell phones are advertised on the Internet, but what is the radiated power of a cell phone submersed in water compared to when it radiates in free space?  What should its current be with the antenna submersed in water in order to maintain the same radiated power as in free space? The cellular phone in this example has the following parameters, ?r = 81, ? = 0, ? = ?0, and uses a 0.008 m (8 mm) long shot dipole antenna that carries 2.5 A current and radiates at 1850 MHz. In order to prove that any change in radiated power is as a result of a change in the medium’s permittivity in which the dipole antenna radiates, and that the permittivity affects its intrinsic impedance, we must first show that the dipole antenna is a Hertzian dipole. To do so, we must calculate the dipole antenna’s wavelength in air and compare it to its physical length, in order to determine if it is electrically shorter than the wavelength of the cell phone’s operating frequency.  We will use Equation 1 below.

Published in MultiPoint Blog
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