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MultiPoint Newsletter - February 2017

R&TTED Invalid after June 12, 2017

Question: When does the R&TTE Directive expire, and what are the significant differences between it and the RED?

Answer: The Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment Directive (R&TTED) 1999/5/EC expires on June 12, 2017 following a one year transition period during which either the R&TTED or the Radio Equipment Directive (RED) 2014/53/EU can be applied as appropriate. Effective June 13, 2017, only the RED can be used to demonstrate compliance.

Products evaluated per the R&TTED and physically in the marketplace (e。g。 in retail stores or in supply chains not controlled by the manufacturer) before June 13, 2017 can continue to be sold。 However, any product not physically in the marketplace before June 13, 2017 must be re-evaluated per the RED before it can be placed in the marketplace。

The RED:

  • Covers radio equipment operating at frequencies below 3000 GHz, including radio equipment operating below 9 kHz not covered by the R&TTED or by National frequency regulations placed on the market (unlike the R&TTED which also applied to “relevant components” of radio equipment);
  • Applies to equipment which intentionally transmits or receives radio waves for communications or radio-determination, regardless of its primary function, be it a “connected” device using an embedded radio module for communications, or purpose-built radio equipment;
  • Includes additional emphasis on spectrum use that requires that radio equipment demonstrate the performance of the receiver, as well as the transmitter, since both impact the efficient and effective use of the spectrum;
  • Does not apply to wired telecommunications terminal equipment that does not function using radio;
  • Includes, with certain modifications, the essential requirements of the Low-Voltage Directive (LVD) and the Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive (EMCD) within its essential requirements, so radio equipment is not subject to these separate directives;
  • Specifically includes Broadcast TV & radio receivers;
  • Calls for common or universal chargers.

The R&TTED included provisions for submitting a Technical Construction File to a Notified Body for review and approval. Following are some of the changes under the RED that will impact application submission, product markings, approval documents, etc.:

  • The Technical Construction File (TCF) is now referred to as the Technical Documentation;
  • A Risk Assessment that addresses the product application and use, installation location, environmental conditions and end-use, must be prepared by the manufacturer and submitted as part of the Technical Documentation;
  • The Class 2 “Alert” symbol is no longer required;
  • A Notified Body (NB) Number is only required for rare approvals that fall under Full Quality Assurance (RED Annex IV);
  • Country Notifications are no longer required;
  • The NB “Letter of Opinion” or “Certificate of Opinion” is now a NB “EU-Type Examination Certificate” (EU TEC);
  • The EU TEC will have an expiration date, the period of validity determined by the NB; 
  • Specific labeling requirements for importers have been added.

The Radio Equipment Directive (RED) “Directive 2014/53/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014…。” published in the Official Journal of the European Union can be found 。

Additional information about the RED can be found .


R&TTED-to-RED Comparison for Self-Declaration

Question: We have a few products that we self-declared as compliant under the R&TTE Directive using harmonized standards in the EU’s Official Journal. We want to make sure these products are compliant with the RED in order to self-declare. What’s the best way to do this to ensure we’re ready by June 13, 2017?

Answer: It is important to start with a review of both the applicable R&TTED and RED harmonized standards for your products from the Official Journal. This comparison should identify the differences and any outstanding requirements to demonstrate compliance with the RED. Any required testing identified during the harmonized standards comparison should be conducted, and the Declaration of Conformity should be updated to reflect the RED harmonized standards before you self-declare.

However, at this time it may be difficult to self-declare under the essential requirements of the RED Articles 3。1 and 3。2 because the Official Journal does not yet include a complete list of harmonized standards under the RED, which may force many manufacturers to utilize a Notified Body (NB) in the meantime。

The RED allows a NB to issue an EU-Type Examination Certificate (EU TEC) based on testing to standards that are harmonized, non-harmonized, and/or in various stages of development, including draft standards and committee-working drafts, if available. If any of these approaches are suggested, the NB should simultaneously provide guidance on any potential risks.

Anyone can perform the review and comparison of the R&TTED and RED standards, but it’s probably safe to assume that if it is done by the NB that will eventually be responsible for reviewing the Technical Documentation submission, consisting of the RED test reports and required supporting documents, the probability of obtaining the EU TEC increases substantially.

斗地主达人American Certification Body, Inc. (ACB, NB Number 1588) offers gap analysis to manufacturers and other parties needing to transition their product compliance from the R&TTED to the RED. Their Gap Analysis Report (GAP) will detail the requirements to demonstrate compliance with the RED.

As with the self-declaration scenario, any necessary testing documented in the GAP would need to be performed, and the Technical Documentation submission made to ACB, who will then evaluate the test results/calculations and supporting documents to assess the product’s compliance with the RED, and if compliant, will issue the EU TEC.

ACB prepared a Q&A on the RED which includes a lot of useful information, as well as ACB’s contact information. You can find it .


Jammers in the EU

Question: It is illegal to operate jammers in the U.S. What is the EU policy with regard to operating jammers?

Answer: As in the U.S., jammers are illegal to operate in the European Union (EU). Within the framework of the EMC Directive and the R&TTE Directive, and presumably under the RED, jammers of any kind, whether GSM, GPS, etc., are illegal. EU Member States do not permit, nor wish to permit, the disruption of radio communications by jamming devices operated by members of the public. Jammers that comply with the EMC Directive, or the R&TTE Directive or the RED, cannot be constructed, and therefore cannot legally be placed on the market within the EU, the EEA or EFTA. Any products that claim compliance must be removed from the market as soon as possible by national market surveillance authorities, and be reported to the European Commission.

Please note that in the CEPT (European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations) member countries, GSM jammers are forbidden from being placed on the market or used, per the Electronic Communication Committee (ECC) recommendation (04/01).


Certification Requirements for Adding Modulation

Question: We originally certified our licensed radio in continuous wave (CW) mode without modulation. We now want to add modulation via hardware that was in place at the time of the original certification. Can this be done via a Class II permissive change?

Answer: Since the new modulation is a factory software/firmware change to be implemented at the manufacturing level, and not by a third party or via a field update, it is possible to apply for a Class II Permissive change. However, if the modulation implementation requires the addition of a hardware modulation circuit, a new FCC certification application would be warranted. Lastly, per 178919 D01 Permissive Change Policy v06斗地主达人, Section V(D) “Third party activation of software changes for any radio parameter such as new frequencies, output power, and/or modulations, or changes that modify the circumstances under which the transmitter is approved to operate, are not allowed unless the device was approved as a software-defined radio (SDR)”.


Standards Updates

EU: New CENELEC Standards Recently Released

This is a shortened list of the CENELEC standards published or made available during the past month:

  • - 2/3/2017 - Integrated circuits - EMC evaluation of transceivers - Part 2: LIN transceivers
  •  - 2/10/2017 - Sound system equipment: headphones and earphones associated with personal music players - maximum sound pressure level measurement methodology - Part 3: measurement method for sound dose management
  •  - 2/10/2017 - Safety requirements for power electronic converter systems and equipment - Part 1: General
  •  - 2/17/2017 - Radio frequency and coaxial cable assemblies - Part 2-5: Detail specification for cable assemblies for radio and TV receivers - Frequency range 0 MHz to 1 000 MHz, IEC 61169-2 connectors
  •  - 2/17/2017 - Radio frequency and coaxial cable assemblies - Part 2-6: Detail specification for cable assemblies for radio and TV receivers - Frequency range 0 MHz to 3 000 MHz, IEC 61169-24 connectors
  •  - 2/24/2017 - Magnetic materials - Part 15: Methods for the determination of the relative magnetic permeability of feebly magnetic materials
  •  - 2/24/2017 - Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 4-10: Testing and measurement techniques - Damped oscillatory magnetic field immunity test
  •  - 2/24/2017 - Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 4-31: Testing and measurement techniques - AC mains ports broadband conducted disturbance immunity test
  •  - 2/24/2017 - Safety requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control and laboratory use - Part 2-101: Particular requirements for in vitro diagnostic (IVD) medical equipment

See for additional information.

EU: New ETSI Standards Recently Released

This is a shortened list of the new ETSI standards published during the past month:

  •  - January 2017 - Short Range Devices; Transport and Traffic Telematics (TTT); Radar equipment operating in the 76 GHz to 77 GHz range; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU; Part 1: Ground based vehicular radar
  •  - January 2017 - Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) on-board vessels communications systems and equipment; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - January 2017 - Short Range Devices; Transport and Traffic Telematics (TTT); Radar equipment operating in the 76 GHz to 77 GHz range; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU; Part 2: Fixed infrastructure radar equipment
  • - February 2017 -  Mobile Communication On Board Aircraft (MCOBA) systems; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - Short Range Devices (SRD) operating in the frequency range 25 MHz to 1 000 MHz; Part 1: Technical characteristics and methods of measurement
  • - February 2017 - ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 1: Common technical requirements; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.1(b) of Directive 2014/53/EU and the essential requirements of article 6 of Directive 2014/30/EU
  • - February 2017 - Short Range Devices (SRD) operating in the frequency range 25 MHz to 1 000 MHz; Part 2: Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU for non specific radio equipment
  • - February 2017 - ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 4: Specific conditions for fixed radio links and ancillary equipment; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.1(b) of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 17: Specific conditions for Broadband Data Transmission Systems; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.1(b) of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 33: Specific conditions for Ultra-WideBand (UWB) devices; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.1(b) of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 50: Specific conditions for Cellular Communication Base Station (BS), repeater and ancillary equipment; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.1(b) of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - Short Range Devices (SRD) operating in the frequency range 25 MHz to 1 000 MHz; Part 3-2: Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU; Wireless alarms operating in designated LDC/HR frequency bands 868,60 MHz to 868,70 MHz, 869,25 MHz to 869,40 MHz, 869,65 MHz to 869,70 MHz
  • - February 2017 - Short Range Devices (SRD) operating in the frequency range 25 MHz to 1 000 MHz; Part 4: Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU; Metering devices operating in designated band 169,400 MHz to 169,475 MHz
  • - February 2017 - Short Range Devices (SRD); Radio equipment in the frequency range 9 kHz to 25 MHz and inductive loop systems in the frequency range 9 kHz to 30 MHz; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS); Radiocommunications equipment operating in the 5 855 MHz to 5 925 MHz frequency band; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - Wireless Microphones; Audio PMSE up to 3 GHz; Part 2: Class B Receivers; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU 
  • - February 2017 - Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for equipment for generation, transmission and reception of Digital Selective Calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and/or VHF mobile service; Part 5: Handheld VHF Class H DSC 
  • - February 2017 - Wireless Microphones; Audio PMSE up to 3 GHz; Part 3: Class C Receivers; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - Short Range Devices (SRD); Social Alarms Equipment operating in the frequency range 25 MHz to 1 000 MHz; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - February 2017 - System Reference document (SRdoc); Short Range Devices (SRD); Technical characteristics for Ultra Narrow Band (UNB) SRDs operating in the UHF spectrum below 1 GHz
  • - February 2017 - Short Range Devices; Transport and Traffic Telematics (TTT); Radar equipment operating in the 76 GHz to 77 GHz range; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU; Part 3: Railway/Road Crossings obstacle detection system applications
  • - February 2017 - Short Range Devices; Transport and Traffic Telematics (TTT); Radar equipment operating in the 76 GHz to 77 GHz range; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU; Obstacle Detection Radars for Use on Manned Rotorcraft 
  • - March 2017 - VHF radiotelephone equipment for general communications and associated equipment for Class "D" Digital Selective Calling (DSC); Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of articles 3.2 and 3.3(g) of Directive 2014/53/EU 
  • - March 2017 - Portable Very High Frequency (VHF) radiotelephone equipment for the maritime mobile service operating in the VHF bands with integrated handheld class H DSC; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of articles 3.2 and 3.3(g) of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - March 2017 - VHF transmitters and receivers as Coast Stations for GMDSS and other applications in the maritime mobile service; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • - March 2017 - Maritime low power VHF personal locating beacons employing Digital Selective Calling (DSC); Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU 
  • - March 2017 - Portable Very High Frequency (VHF) radiotelephone equipment for the maritime mobile service operating in the VHF bands with integrated handheld class H DSC; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of articles 3.2 and 3.3(g) of Directive 2014/53/EU

斗地主达人See for additional information。

EU: New IEC Standards Recently Released

This is a shortened list of the new IEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (2/23/2017) - Adjustable speed electrical power drive systems - Part 3: EMC requirements and specific test methods
  • - (2/23/2017) - Adjustable speed electrical power drive systems - Part 3: EMC requirements and specific test methods
  • - (2/24/2017) - Amendment 1 - Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 3-3: Limits - Limitation of voltage changes, voltage fluctuations and flicker in public low-voltage supply systems, for equipment with rated current ≤16 A per phase and not subject to conditional connection
  • - (2/24/2017) - Amendment 1 - Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 4-11: Testing and measurement techniques - Voltage dips, short interruptions and voltage variations immunity tests
  • - (2/7/2017) - Electric vehicle conductive charging system - Part 1: General requirements
  • - (2/7/2017) - Secondary cells and batteries containing alkaline or other non-acid electrolytes - Safety requirements for portable sealed secondary cells, and for batteries made from them, for use in portable applications - Part 1: Nickel systems
  • - (2/7/2017) - Secondary cells and batteries containing alkaline or other non-acid electrolytes - Safety requirements for portable sealed secondary lithium cells, and for batteries made from them, for use in portable applications - Part 2: Lithium systems
  • - (2/7/2017) - Secondary cells and batteries containing alkaline or other non-acid electrolytes - Secondary lithium cells and batteries for portable applications - Part 3: Prismatic and cylindrical lithium secondary cells and batteries made from them

See for additional information。

EU – Newly Published EN 300 328

The new RED version of was recently published in the EU Official Journal and covers wideband transmission systems operating in the 2。4 GHz band such as Bluetooth, Zigbee, and Wi-Fi。

Manufacturers are required to update any Declarations of Conformity (DoC) based on EN 300 328 versions earlier than V2.1.1. The new version includes the following significant updates:

  • Receiver Blocking is a new requirement;
  • Alternative test method for Power Spectral Density;
  • Reduced minimum number for hopping frequencies for non-adaptive FHSS equipment.

Canada – Release of RSS-247, Issue 2

On February 23, 2017, Industry Canada released , replacing RSS-247, Issue 1, dated May 2015. Changes in Issue 2 are as follows:

  1. Section 3.3 states the requirement for emissions that fall within restricted frequency bands to comply with the provisions in RSS-Gen, General Requirements for Compliance of Radio Apparatus;
  2. Section 5.4(b) reinstated the former e.i.r.p. limit for frequency hopping systems operating in the band 2400-2483.5 MHz, which employ a hopset with less than 75 channels;
  3. Section 6.2 adds a clarification to ensure that emissions that fall within restricted frequency bands shall comply with the provisions in RSS-Gen;
  4. Section 6.2 states the measurement method for power and unwanted emission limits for licence-exempt local area network devices and digital transmission systems operating in the 5 GHz band;
  5. Sections 6.2.1 and 6.2.2 add a provision to allow original equipment manufacturer (OEM) devices installed in road vehicles to operate in the band 5150-5250 MHz with an e.i.r.p. limit of 30 mW or 1.76 + 10 log10B, dBm, whichever is less stringent;
  6. Section 6.2.1.2 clarifies the requirement for devices operating in the band 5150-5250 MHz, which have bandwidth that falls into the band 5250-5350 MHz;
  7. Section 6.2.2.2(b) permits the requisite "for indoor use only" notice for equipment operating in the band 5250-5350 MHz to be included in the user manual;
  8. Section 6.2.2.3 applies the requirement of e.i.r.p. at different elevations for equipment operating in the band 5250-5350 MHz to outdoor fixed devices only;
  9. Section 6.2.2.3 limits e.i.r.p. of OEM devices installed in road vehicles to 30 mW or 1.76 + 10 log10B, dBm, whichever is less stringent;
  10. Section 6.2.2.3 allows equipment, other than outdoor fixed devices, operating in the band 5250-5350 MHz having e.i.r.p. greater than 200 mW to either comply with the e.i.r.p. elevation mask or to include a firmware feature to reduce their e.i.r.p. permanently should it be requested by the Department;
  11. Section 6.2.3.2 allows equipment operating in the band 5650-5725 MHz with bandwidth overlapping the band 5725-5850 MHz to meet the emission limit of −27 dBm/MHz e.i.r.p. at 5850 MHz;
  12. Section 6.2.4.2 modifies the unwanted emission limits for LE-LAN devices and DTSs operating in the band 5725-5850 MHz;
  13. Section 6.2.4.2 adds a transition date for certification of LE-LAN devices and DTSs operating in the band 5725-5850 MHz to have unwanted emissions comply with either provisions in Section 5.5 or Section 6.2.4.2;
  14. Section 6.2.4(b) adds a transition date for manufacture, importation, distribute, lease, offer for sales, or sales of LE-LAN devices and DTSs operating in the band 5725-5850 MHz which do not comply with provisions in Section 6.2.4(b); 
  15. Annex A deletes the word "pre-installation" to clarify that the verification of e.i.r.p. compliance at different elevations for devices operating in the band 5250-5350 MHz needs to be done at the time of certification (before installation); the verification of compliance must be submitted with the test report for equipment requiring certification.

Vietnam – New Rules for Wireless Devices

Vietnam’s Ministry of Information and Communications (MIC) newly released Circular 46/2016/TT-BTTTT became effective February 14, 2017. Please see below for important changes found in the new Circular:

  1. Output power limit for WLAN products operating from 2400‑2483.5 MHz is increased from 100 mW to 200 mW;
  2. For UHF RFID, the band 920-925 MHz is changed to 918‑923 MHz*;
  3. Wireless charging technology is permitted on the following frequency bands: 9‑148.5 kHz, 326.5 kHz, 340 kHz, 6.765-6.795 MHz;
  4. 924‑925 MHz is no longer available for Cordless Telephones;
  5. A new band of 4200‑4800 MHz is allocated to ultra-wide band devices;
  6. New bands are allocated to frequency alerting and detecting devices;
  7. New bands are allocated to wireless audio devices for hearing assistance;
  8. New bands are allocated to Equipment Automatic Identification (AIS);
  9. New bands are allocated to automatic identification equipment development report for search and rescue (AIS-SART).

* All RFID products currently approved for and using the band 920-925 MHz are allowed to be continuously imported, distributed and used in Vietnam until the expiration dates of their respective Type Approval certificates。 There is no impact on existing Type Approval certificates issued based on current Circular 03。 For new applications, Type Approval certificates will be granted based on Circular 46。

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