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MultiPoint Newsletter - December 2012 Issue

Dear Colleague,

We have provided typical questions and answers that represent in most cases technical opinions with justification in FCC, IC and CE requirements. The particulars of the product for certification must be considered with respect to the applicability of these questions and answers. We hope you find our update valuable and welcome your feedback if you have any special needs or questions. Call us at 703.689.0368 for your testing requirements. You can view archived issues of MultiPoint at our website.

Rhein Tech Laboratories wishes you all a happy holiday season!


IC Notice 2012-DRS1203 Regarding FCC RF Exposure KDB Procedures

Question: We manufacture portable devices that are head and/or body worn. What is Industry Canada's position on accepting FCC Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) Knowledge Database (KDB) policies?

Answer: Because certain measurement procedures are not currently covered in the international standards referenced in Industry Canada’s RSS-102 – RF exposure compliance of radiocommunication apparatus (All frequency Bands), Industry Canada published 斗地主达人Notice 2012-DRS1203 to address the applicability of the FCC RF exposure KDB procedures published on October 24, 2012. Notice 2012-DRS1203 provides guidance on specific requirements that were incorporated into the FCC RF exposure KDB procedures, as well as other procedures, that can be utilized on an interim measure, when seeking certification of radiocommunication apparatus for the Canadian market.   Please review the Notice and the website in detail.


FCC Rules for Receivers with <30 MHz & >960 MHz Tuning

Question: What are the FCC's applicable rules for testing a receiver whose tuning is below 30 MHz and above 960 MHz?

Answer: FCC rules and regulations are not applicable to receivers with the specific tuning capability of less than 30 MHz and greater than 960 MHz.   states the following:

斗地主达人“Only those receivers that operate (tune) within the frequency range of 30-960 MHz, CB receivers and radar detectors are subject to the authorizations shown in paragraph (a) of this section. However, receivers indicated as being subject to Declaration of Conformity that are contained within a transceiver, the transmitter portion of which is subject to certification, shall be authorized under the verification procedure. Receivers operating above 960 MHz or below 30 MHz, except for radar detectors and CB receivers, are exempt from complying with the technical provisions of this part but are subject to .”

Thus the receiver described in the question does not fall under the purview of FCC 47CFR§15.101(b). However, this receiver’s digital circuitry must adhere to FCC 47CFR§15.33(b)1 with respect to defining it as either a Class A or Class B device. Frequencies from the digital section of your receiver are the only determining factor in selecting the frequency range of radiated measurements when performing testing to determine if it is a Class A or B device. You must ignore any emissions associated with the Local Oscillator (LO) tuning function of your receiver.

Lastly, FCC , Antenna Power Conduction Limits for a Receiver, is not required for this specific receiver, but is required for radar detector and CB receivers。


Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) Transmitters

Question: 斗地主达人We have developed a Medical Device Radiocommunication Service transmitter (Med Radio) and will be seeking FCC certification. Can a TCB certify our device? What are the label requirements for MedRadio devices?

Answer: The most recent version of the TCB exclusion list published by the FCC, version 13, dated October 24, 2012, includes MedRadio transmitters subject to 47CFR§95 Subpart I, designed to operate in the bands 413-419 MHz, 426-432 MHz, 438-444 MHz, 451-457 MHz, and 2360-2400 MHz . As a result, a TCB cannot approve your MedRadio transmitter. The certification application must be submitted directly to the FCC.

Per 47CFR§95.1217, following are the label requirements for MedRadio transmitter devices:

“(a)(1) MedRadio programmer/control transmitters operating in the 401-406 MHz band shall be labeled as provided in part 2 of this chapter and shall bear the following statement in a conspicuous location on the device:

’This device may not interfere with stations operating in the 400。150-406。000 MHz band in the Meteorological Aids, Meteorological Satellite, and Earth Exploration Satellite Services and must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation。’

The statement may be placed in the instruction manual for the transmitter where it is not feasible to place the statement on the device.

(a)(2) MedRadio programmer/control transmitters operating in the 413-419 MHz, 426-432 MHz, 438-444 MHz, and 451-457 MHz bands shall be labeled as provided in part 2 of this chapter and shall bear the following statement in a conspicuous location on the device:

’This device may not interfere with stations authorized to operate on a primary basis in the 413-419 MHz, 426-432 MHz, 438-444 MHz, and 451-457 MHz bands, and must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation。’

斗地主达人The statement may be placed in the instruction manual for the transmitter where it is not feasible to place the statement on the device。

(a)(3) MedRadio programmer/control transmitters operating in the 2360-2400 MHz band shall be labeled as provided in part 2 of this chapter and shall bear the following statement in a conspicuous location on the device:

‘This device may not interfere with stations authorized to operate on a primary basis in the 2360-2400 MHz band, and must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.’

The statement may be placed in the instruction manual for the transmitter where it is not feasible to place the statement on the device.

(b) Where a MedRadio programmer/control transmitter is constructed in two or more sections connected by wire and marketed together; the statement specified in this section is required to be affixed only to the main control unit.

(c) MedRadio transmitters shall be identified with a serial number, except that, in the 2360-2400 MHz band, only the MedRadio programmer/controller transmitter shall be identified with a serial number。 The FCC ID number associated with a medical implant transmitter and the information required by §2。925 of this chapter may be placed in the instruction manual for the transmitter and on the shipping container for the transmitter, in lieu of being placed directly on the transmitter。”

Note: On Sept. 11, 2012, paragraph (a)(3) in §95.1217 was added to the electronic version of the Code of Federal Regulations. This paragraph contains requirements for information collection and recordkeeping, however it will not become effective until the Office of Management and Budget has approved it.


New EN 300 328 Adequate Spectrum Sharing Mechanism

Question: We are a manufacturer of WiFi, Zigbee and Bluetooth devices. We recently noticed that our device now has to meet adequate spectrum sharing mechanisms, e.g. Listen Before Talk (LBT), Detect And Avoid (DAA), etc. contained in the new harmonized standard EN 300 328 V1.8.1, published in the 斗地主达人October 23rd, 2012 version of the Official Journal  of the European Union. How do we meet this requirement?

Answer: The requirement that Wi-Fi, Zigbee and Bluetooth devices must have an adequate spectrum sharing mechanism implemented is not actually new, however the requirement to demonstrate compliance through testing was not spelled out in EN 300 328 V1.7.1 as it is now in EN 300 328 V1.8.1. To say the least, EN 300 328 V1.7.1 is somewhat ambiguous since it only requires that a device contain a Medium Access Protocol (MAP), which is quite different from an adaptive adequate spectrum sharing mechanism, as now required in EN 300 328 V1.8.1.

In the past, many presumed compliance with the MAP requirement under EN 300 328 V1。7。1 since Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Zigbee devices are based on IEEE 802。11, IEEE 802。15。1 and IEEE 802。15。4 technology respectively。 Now, just stating that a device meets the MAP requirement is not sufficient anymore。

As of October 23, 2012, products sold in the European Union must comply with the adequate spectrum sharing mechanism requirements included in EN 300 328 V1。8。1, proven through testing and demonstrable evidence that the device meets the requirements。

It is expected that the R&TTE CA will issue guidance on this issue soon。 In the meantime, check with your Notified Body (NB) to determine its plans to ensure compliance with this new requirement。


Correction:

We would like to thank Mr. Mark Luksich of Motorola Solutions for pointing out an inaccurate statement in our response regarding Software Defined Radios in our November MultiPoint. The question, and revised response, are shown below:

Question: We manufacture wireless devices and would like to know whether the FCC would permit us to allow professional installers or authorized service dealers to ensure compliance by setting the RF parameters, or conditions of operations for our approved device, using the software configuration controls.

Revised Answer: The FCC will permit the grantee to allow professional installers or authorized service dealers to set the RF parameters via software configuration controls on a device in an effort to ensure compliance. Parameters such as frequencies and transmitter output power can be configured based only on the values listed on the grant; the professional installer cannot turn off DFS. This is only allowable if your device was approved as a Software Defined Radio, or if you received specific approval from the FCC during the certification process to do so. Click on the link, “594280 D01 Software Configuration Control v01r02” for further guidance on this issue.


Standards Updates

EU: NEW CENELEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the CENELEC standards published or made available during the past month:

  • - (11/16/2012) - Specification for radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus and methods - Part 1-4: Radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus - Antennas and test sites for radiated disturbance measurements
  • - (11/16/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-5: Particular requirements for dishwashers
  • - (11/16/2012) - Magnetic materials - Part 15: Methods for the determination of the relative magnetic permeability of feebly magnetic materials
  • - (11/16/2012) - Connectors for electronic equipment - Tests and measurements - Part 24-1: Magnetic interference tests - Test 24a: Residual magnetism
  • - (11/16/2012) - Safety requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control, and laboratory use - Part 2-032: Particular requirements for hand-held and hand-manipulated current sensors for electrical test and measurement
  • - (11/23/2012) - Fuel cell technologies - Part 5-1: Portable fuel cell power systems - Safety
  • - (11/30/2012) - Specification for radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus and methods - Part 1-5: Radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus - Specifications and validation procedures for CALTS and REFTS from 30 MHz to 1 000 MHz
  • - (11/30/2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility - Product family standard for audio, video, audio-visual and entertainment lighting control apparatus for professional use - Part 1: Emissions
  • - (11/30/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-54: Particular requirements for surface-cleaning appliances for household use employing liquids or steam
  • - (11/30/2012) - Programmable controllers - Part 6: Functional safety
  • - (11/30/2012) - Discharge lamps (excluding fluorescent lamps) - Safety specifications
  • - (12/7/2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment - Emission requirements
  • - (12/7/2012) - Fuel cell technologies - Part 6-100: Micro fuel cell power systems - Safety
  • - (12/7/2012) - Self-ballasted LED-lamps for general lighting services by voltage > 50 V - Safety specifications

See CENELEC斗地主达人 for additional information.

EU: NEW ETSI STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new ETSI standards published during the past month:

  • - (November 2012) - Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS); Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements for mobile terminals and ancillary equipment (3GPP TS 34.124 version 11.0.0 Release 11)
  • - (November 2012) - Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS); LTE; Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC); Table of international requirements for mobile terminals and ancillary equipment (3GPP TR 34.926 version 11.0.1 Release 11)
  • - (November 2012) - LTE; Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access (E-UTRA); Base Station (BS) and repeater ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) (3GPP TS 36.113 version 11.1.0 Release 11)
  • - (November 2012) - LTE; Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access (E-UTRA); Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements for mobile terminals and ancillary equipment (3GPP TS 36.124 version 11.1.0 Release 11)
  • - (November 2012) - Digital cellular telecommunications system (Phase 2+); Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS); LTE; E-UTRA, UTRA and GSM/EDGE; Multi-Standard Radio (MSR) Base Station (BS) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) (3GPP TS 37.113 version 11.1.0 Release 11)
  • - (November 2012) - Global System for Mobile communications (GSM); Harmonized EN for Base Station Equipment covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (November 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 4: Specific conditions for fixed radio links and ancillary equipment
  • - (December 2012) - IMT cellular networks; Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive; Part 2: CDMA Direct Spread (UTRA FDD) User Equipment (UE)

See ETSI website for additional information.

EU: NEW IEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new IEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (11/14/2012) - Corrigendum 1 - Medical electrical equipment - Part 1: General requirements for basic safety and essential performance
  • - (11/15/2012)Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-2: Particular requirements for vacuum cleaners and water-suction cleaning appliances
  • - (11/15/2012) - Amendment 1 - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-2: Particular requirements for vacuum cleaners and water-suction cleaning appliances
  • - (11/15/2012) - Amendment 1 - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-27: Particular requirements for appliances for skin exposure to ultraviolet and infrared radiation
  • - (11/28/2012) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 1-8: General requirements for basic safety and essential performance - Collateral Standard: General requirements, tests and guidance for alarm systems in medical electrical equipment and medical electrical systems
  • - (11/28/2012) - Amendment 1 - Medical electrical equipment - Part 1-8: General requirements for basic safety and essential performance - Collateral standard: General requirements, tests and guidance for alarm systems in medical electrical equipment and medical electrical systems
  • - (11/28/2012) - Medical electrical equipment - ALL PARTS
  • - (12/11/2012) - Radiation protection instrumentation - Environmental, electromagnetic and mechanical performance requirements
  • - (12/13/12) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-8: Particular requirements for shavers, hair clippers and similar appliances
  • - (12/5/2012) - Safety of primary and secondary lithium cells and batteries during transport
  • - (12/6/2012) - Secondary cells and batteries containing alkaline or other non-acid electrolytes - Safety requirements for portable sealed secondary cells, and for batteries made from them, for use in portable applications

See for additional information.

FCC – NPRM to Allow Use GHz Band for Small Cell Use

On December 12, 2012, the FCC proposed to make available 100 megahertz of shared spectrum in the 3.5 GHz Band (3550-3650 MHz) using small cell and database technologies. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) broadly reflects the innovative thinking of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), which issued a report this summer recommending spectrum sharing and small cell use in the 3.5 GHz Band. It also builds upon the FCC’s previous work to free up spectrum by promoting spectrum sharing and enabling innovative licensing techniques.

斗地主达人The proposal lays the groundwork for the widespread deployment of small cell technologies across 100 megahertz of spectrum, and would spur significant innovation in wireless technologies and applications throughout the economy, while protecting incumbent users in the band。

The proposal envisions three tiers of users, each with different levels of rights and protections in the 3。5 GHz Band。 The first tier, Incumbent Access, would include authorized federal users and grandfathered fixed satellite service licensees。 These incumbents would be afforded protection from all other users in the 3。5 GHz Band。 The second tier, Protected Access, would include critical use facilities, such as hospitals, utilities, government facilities, and public safety entities that would be afforded quality-assured access to a portion of the 3。5 GHz Band in certain designated locations。 The third tier, General Authorized Access, would include all other users – including the general public – that would have the ability to operate in the 3。5 GHz Band subject to protections for Incumbent Access and Protected Access users。 A spectrum access system, incorporating a geo-location enabled dynamic database, would govern access to the 3。5 GHz Band。  

Canada – Release of SP 1435 MHz, Spectrum Utilization Policy Decisions for the Band 1435-1525 MHz

On December 1, 2012, Industry Canada released (SP 1435 MHz). This policy addresses the spectrum allocations and utilization policies for the band 1435-1525 MHz.

The main impact of the new policy is as follows:

  1. Immediate rescission of the DAB Allotment Plan for the band 1452-1492 MHz, including all associated channels to FM and AM stations across the band.
  2. The allocation to BSS in the band 1452-1492 MHz is removed from the .

Canada does not currently have a formal arrangement with the U。S。 Government for the sharing of the band 1435-1525 MHz for the AMT service along the border regions。 Licensees will be subject to any future agreements between Canada and the United States regarding use of these systems in the border regions, which may include obtaining departmental approval before allowing certain stations to operate。

Ukraine – Update on Conformity Declarations

Rhein Tech was recently advised that “Law of Ukraine No. 5312-VI” was passed on November 6, 2012 and the requirement for registration of Conformity Declarations in Ukraine is no longer in force. From this point forward, Conformity Declarations being obtained in Ukraine for R&TTE, EMC, or Safety will no longer require registration by a Conformity Assessment Body in Ukraine and can be self-declared by the manufacturer or authorized representative of the manufacturer.

Compulsory requirements to obtain EMC and Safety Declarations will remain in place where as R&TTE Declarations are likely to become mandatory on January 1, 2013 however any RF Certificate application started before this time will be permitted to be completed. It is expected that all RF Certificates obtained will remain valid until their expiration date by which a R&TTE Declaration will be required to allow continued importation into Ukraine.

Labeling requirements for any Conformity Declaration obtained will remain mandatory however the Conformity Assessment Body number will not be required. Conformity Declarations registered by a Conformity Assessment Body however may use the Conformity Assessment Body identification number to assist with showing evidence of product compliance in Ukraine.

斗地主达人However, in order to avoid any issues at customs or with market surveillance authorities to demonstrate compliance, Rhein Tech recommends that even though the manufacturer or authorized representative of the manufacturer can now self declare products in Ukraine, that Conformity Declarations be registered by a Conformity Assessment Body.

Palestine – 2.4 GHz & 5 GHz Bands Now Allowed

In November 2012, Palestine’s Ministry (MTIT) confirmed that WLAN devices operating in the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz band are permitted as follows:

  • 402 – 2482MHz (Channels 1 -13) maximum output power of 1000mW + 6dBi
  • 5150 – 5250MHz (Channels 36 – 48) maximum output power of 1000mW + 6dBit
  • 5250 – 5350MHz (Channels 52 – 64) maximum output power of 1000mW + 6dBit

Additionally, the 5725 – 5825 MHz band is open for point-to-point fixed link products, with maximum output power of 1000mW + 23dBi. Use of this band is subject to licensing.

The following bands are not permitted for use:

  • 5470 – 5725MHz (Channels 100-140)
  • 5815 – 5850MHz (Channel 165)
  • 5850 – 5875MHz (Channel 173)

Nepal – Enforcement of Type Approval Certification

The Nepal Telecommunications Authority (NTA) is preparing to enforce Type Approval Certification (TAC) for mobile handsets。 NTAr says there already is a provision in the law for TAC and that it will begin monitoring the market to enforce the rules。

“We are preparing to start a stern market monitoring to enforce the TAC rule. We will also work closely with the telecom operators so that unregistered types (of handsets) are not allowed in the country,” Republica quotes Binod Shrestha, assistant director at NTA, as saying. About 50 percent of handsets sold in Nepal do not have TAC.

In a bid to enforce the rule, Shrestha said the NTA has also formed a taskforce to ease the process of issuing TAC. At present, NTA is providing TAC on the basis of approval certificate issued by the regulators of developed countries. But the taskforce is now exploring the possibility of setting up a new system and hiring consultants for lab testing of the handsets, so that importers could be freed from the burden of producing certification from other countries.

“In order to ensure all the handsets to have TAC, we are preparing to work with the operators making it mandatory for the customers to provide IMEI (International Mobile Equipment Identity) number to obtain the SIM card,” Shrestha added. If implemented strictly, customers using unregistered handset might not be able to get the mobile service at all.

Although Nepal made TAC compulsory in 2008, lack of proper monitoring and enforcement has allowed many manufacturers and distributors to sell their products in Nepal without complying with the law.

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