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MultiPoint Newsletter - June 2012 Issue

Dear Colleague,

We have provided typical questions and answers that represent in most cases technical opinions with justification in FCC, IC and CE requirements. The particulars of the product for certification must be considered with respect to the applicability of these questions and answers. We hope you find our update valuable and welcome your feedback if you have any special needs or questions. Call us at 703.689.0368 for your testing requirements. You can view archived issues of MultiPoint at our website.


FCC Identifier Placement

Question: We are a manufacturer of tablet computers with an expansion bay compartment for future upgrades, accessible using a Phillips head screwdriver, intended for sale to the general public. After reading Section 4, Label Location for Part 15 and 18 Devices, in the FCC Guidelines for Labelling and User Information for Devices Subject to Part 15 and Part 18 (784748 D01 Labelling Part 15 &18 Guidelines v07), we have the following questions:

Does the FCC consider the battery compartment as the only “user-accessible” area, or will the FCC consider an expansion bay compartment for future upgrades to be a “user-accessible” area?

Does the FCC consider a Phillips head screwdriver to be a “special tool”?

If we include a statement in our user manual that “the FCC ID label is located in the expansion bay compartment of the tablet”, would this be sufficient to comply with the FCC rules and regulations?

Answer: 斗地主达人Based on our interpretation of the labeling guidelines document cited, and experience with the FCC, including interactions and FCC KDB postings, we offer the following opinion as to why it may be acceptable to place the FCC ID label in the expansion bay compartment.

The expansion bay is a user-accessible area;

The device is handheld (tablets, notebook computers are considered as handheld);

The FCC identifier is visible at the time of purchase. Marketing the device without the battery installed when the label is in the battery compartment is acceptable, provided the battery compartment is visible at the time of purchase. The FCC ID on the box, or additional documentation directing the user where to find the FCC ID label, also satisfies this requirement;

The FCC does not consider a Phillips head screwdriver to be a “special tool”.

The end-user accessible area must not require any special tools for access, and the FCC label must not be placed on a removable part;

The FCC ID, Model Number, or FCC logo must be on the label and must meet all general labeling requirements or policies that apply for Certification, Verification or DoC.

If the user manual will not be visible to the end-user at the time of purchase, it is prudent to put the FCC ID on the product packaging to ensure that the FCC ID is visible to the purchaser at the time of purchase, in addition to stating in the user manual where the FCC ID label is located.

As always, the FCC is the final arbiter of its rules and regulations, and will make the final ruling。 Please contact them directly for further guidance。 The FCC KDB site states the following:

FCC staff publications and replies to inquiries from the KDB are based on one or more of the following criteria:

  1. Responses that the FCC staff have given to prior inquiries.
  2. Staff interpretations of the Commission's rules and policies.
  3. Prior staff practices.

It is important to understand that these staff interpretations do not prevent the Commission from making a different decision in any matter that comes to its attention for resolution。


New Draft of IC ICES-003

Question: Industry Canada (IC) recently circulated a draft ICES-003 Issue 5, March 12, 2012, with a new product labeling requirement for Self-Declaration of Compliance to Industry Canada ICES-3 for manufacturers or importers, outlined in Section 8. The draft states that each unit of an ITE model shall bear a label indicating the model’s compliance with ICES-3 A or B limits, and includes other requirements for the label attachment, location, font size, etc.

The Preface in the draft reads in part:

A transition period ending December 31, 2012, is provided, within which compliance with ICES-003, Issue 5, or ICES-003, Issue 4, will be accepted. After this date, only compliance with ICES-003, Issue 5, will be accepted.

Based on the information in this draft, can you please clarify which of the following will be affected effective January 1, 2013?

  1. Products manufactured and labeled after the effective date,
  2. Products imported after the effective date, regardless of the manufacture date,
  3. Products sold after the effective date, regardless of the manufacture date,
  4. Products placed into service after the effective date, regardless of the manufacture date.

Answer: Based on the language in this draft, we cannot give you a definitive response with regard to the affected products, however we can assure you that these questions will be addressed in subsequent drafts.

In the meantime, we contacted IC in an attempt to obtain additional information。  We received the following response from IC:

The latest IC draft has the following text in the preface, which should address your concerns. The transition date will be approximately one year from the date of publication. It is expected that IC will publish ICES-003 by the end of July 2012.

Preface in ICES-003, Issue 5 Draft:

斗地主达人This Interference-Causing Equipment Standard ICES-003, Issue 5 sets out standard requirements for Information Technology Equipment (ITE).

This document will be in force as of the publication date of Notice SMSE-XXX-XX in Canada Gazette, Part I.

斗地主达人A transition period ending MONTH, DAY, YEAR, is provided, within which compliance with ICES-003, Issue 5, or ICES-003, Issue 4, will be accepted. After this date, only compliance with ICES-003, Issue 5, will be accepted. The requirements in ICES-003 Issue 5 apply to new models. Existing models in compliance with a previous issue of ICES-003 shall remain compliant under the requirements of that previous issue or may adopt the requirements in Issue 5.

In addition, a footnote has been added to Section 8:

"The labelling requirements apply to new models. Existing models may continue with the requirements in Issue 4 or adopt the requirements in Issue 5."


EAS and Intermediary Devices

Question: We are contemplating EAS (Emergency Alert System) product development and have the following questions:

A. How does the FCC define Intermediary Devices?

B. Please describe a universal intermediary device, a component intermediary device, and a hybrid intermediary device?

C. Can TCBs issue FCC original grants and Class II Permissive Changes for EAS?

Answer A: The FCC defines an Intermediary Device in 47CFR§11.2 as a stand-alone device that carries out the functions of monitoring for, receiving and/or acquiring, and decoding EAS messages formatted in the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) in accordance with , and converting the messages into a format that can be input into a separate EAS decoder, EAS encoder, or unit combining such decoder and encoder functions, so that the EAS message output by such separate EAS decoder, EAS encoder, or unit combining such decoder and encoder functions, and all other functions attendant to processing such EAS message, comply with the requirements in this part. For more information on Intermediary Devices and the EAS, click on FCC’s Fifth Report and Order FCC 12-7.

Answer B: A universal intermediary device is a device that receives CAP formatted messages at its input, and outputs EAS audio tones that can in turn be input into the audio input of any legacy device. In this case, a legacy device refers to EAS encoder/decoder units which do not have integrated CAP support, unlike Intermediary Devices described above. By definition, a universal intermediary device is a stand-alone device since it operates entirely independent of, and can be operated with, any legacy device. Therefore, a universal intermediary device can and should be tested alone.

By contrast, a component intermediary device does not output audio; instead it outputs proprietary coding used internally by the legacy device so that it can process the converted CAP alert-data. The proprietary coding is relayed over a physical, hard-wired connection between the component intermediary device and the legacy device. A component intermediary device is stand-alone only in the sense that it may have its own enclosure, power supply, etc., and it can output some signals, however those signals have no meaning unless the component intermediary device is connected and interoperates with the intended legacy device.

A hybrid intermediary device is a combination of a universal intermediary device and a component intermediary device. As might be expected, hybrid intermediary devices have two sets of testing requirements:

  1. To test the universal intermediary device output, the device would need to be tested independently as a stand-alone device (i.e., tested to make sure it generates the EAS tones correctly since they will be the audio input of the legacy device).
  2. To test the component intermediary device output, the device must be tested with the legacy device with which it is designed to interoperate.

If the device functions as described here, both test requirements apply。 If the device can only function as described for the component intermediary device, then the system testing would apply。

Answer C: TCBs are allowed by the FCC to issue certification grants for original devices and Class II permissive change filings for EAS products.


IEEE 802.11ac FCC Test Procedure

Question: What is the new IEEE 802.11ac™ standard, and what FCC test procedure is required to certify devices that conform to this standard?

Answer: The IEEE 802.11ac standard is a draft wireless networking standard of 802.11 that will define high-throughput wireless local area networks (WLAN) on the 5 GHz band. It is expected that this specification will enable multi-station WLAN throughput up to 1 gigabit/s and single-link throughput up to 500 megabit/s. To attain this level of throughput, the existing air interface concept in the current 802.11n standard is extended by increasing the RF bandwidth up to 160 MHz, increasing to 8 the Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) spatial stream, adding multi-user MIMO and up to 256 Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) high-density modulation.

The FCC has issued requirements for IEEE 802.11ac and pre-802.11ac emissions testing for compliance with and 15 subpart E (15.401 through 15.407), including how to handle simultaneous transmission by 802.11 devices under multiple rule sections (15.247, 15.407, and Part 90Y public safety).

Click on 644545 D01 Guidance for IEEE 802 11ac v01 to review guidance for emissions testing of IEEE 802.11ac and pre-ac devices, and 644545 D02 Alternative Guidance for 802 11ac v01 to review alternative guidance for operation above 5.725 GHz.


Standards Updates

EU: NEW CENELEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the CENELEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (5/4/2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility EMC) - Part 4-25: Testing and measurement techniques - HEMP immunity test methods for equipment and systems
  • - (5/4/2012) - Energy performance of lamp controlgear - Part 1: Controlgear for fluorescent lamps - Method of measurement to determine the total input power of controlgear circuits and the efficiency of the controlgear
  • - (6/1/2012) - lectrical apparatus for the detection of carbon monoxide in domestic premises - Part 1: Test methods and performance requirements
  • - (6/1/2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility - Product family standard for audio, video, audio-visual and entertainment lighting control apparatus for professional use - Part 2: Immunity
  • - (6/1/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Test code for the determination of airborne acoustical noise - Part 2-4: Particular requirements for washing machines and spin extractors
  • - (6/8/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-2: Particular requirements for vacuum cleaners and water-suction cleaning appliances
  • - (6/8/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-23: Particular requirements for appliances for skin or hair care
  • - (6/8/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-25: Particular requirements for microwave ovens, including combination microwave ovens
  • - (6/8/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-6: Particular requirements for stationary cooking ranges, hobs, ovens and similar appliances
  • - (6/8/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-9: Particular requirements for grills, toasters and similar portable cooking appliances
  • - (6/8/2012) - Material declaration for products of and for the electrotechnical industry
  • - (6/15/2012) - Guide on Membership Criteria of CEN and CENELEC
  • - (6/15/2012) - Safety requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control, and laboratory use - Part 2-033: Particular requirements for hand-held multimeters and other meters, for domestic and professional use, capable of measuring mains voltage

See CENELEC for additional information.

EU: NEW ETSI STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new ETSI standards published during the past month:

  • - (May 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Radio equipment to be used in the 25 MHz to 1 000 MHz frequency range with power levels ranging up to 500 mW; Part 1: Technical characteristics and test methods
  • - (May 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Radio equipment to be used in the 25 MHz to 1 000 MHz frequency range with power levels ranging up to 500 mW; Part 2: Harmonized EN covering essential requirements under article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 34: Specific conditions for External Power Supply (EPS) for mobile phones
  • - (June 2012) - Broadband Radio Access Networks (BRAN); 5 GHz high performance RLAN; Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Wideband transmission systems; Data transmission equipment operating in the 2,4 GHz ISM band and using wide band modulation techniques; Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Low Power Active Medical Implants (LP-AMI) operating in the frequency range 2 483,5 MHz to 2 500 MHz; Part 1: Technical characteristics and test methods
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Low Power Active Medical Implants (LP-AMI) operating in the frequency range 2 483,5 MHz to 2 500 MHz; Part 2: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Interoperability Testing for Maritime Digital Selective Calling (DSC) Radios; Part 1: Requirements catalogue
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Interoperability Testing for Maritime Digital Selective Calling (DSC) Radios; Part 2: Class A/B Test Descriptions
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Interoperability Testing for Maritime Digital Selective Calling (DSC) Radios; Part 3: Class D Test Descriptions
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Interoperability Testing for Maritime Digital Selective Calling (DSC) Radios; Part 4: Class E Test Descriptions
  • - (June 2012) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Interoperability Testing for Maritime Digital Selective Calling (DSC) Radios; Part 5: Handheld VHF Class D Test Descriptions

See ETSI website for additional information.

EU: NEW IEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new IEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (5/23/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-24: Particular requirements for refrigerating appliances, ice-cream   appliances and ice makers
  • - (5/23/2012) - Amendment 1 - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-24: Particular requirements for refrigerating appliances, ice-cream appliances and ice-makers
  • - (5/23/2012) - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-34: Particular requirements for motor-compressors
  • - (5/29/2012) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-26: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of electroencephalographs
  • - (5/29/2012) - Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) - Part 15: Inmarsat FB500 ship earth station - Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results
  • - (5/29/2012) - Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) - Part 4: Inmarsat-C ship earth station and Inmarsat enhanced group call (EGC) equipment - Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results
  • - (5/23/2012) - Reliability testing - Compliance tests for constant failure rate and constant failure intensity
  • - (5/29/2012) - Passive RF and microwave devices, intermodulation level measurement - Part 1: General requirements and measuring methods
  • - (5/29/2012) - High-voltage switchgear and controlgear - Part 107: Alternating current fused circuit-switchers for rated voltages above 1 kV up to and including 52 kV
  • - (5/23/2012) - Process management for avionics - Atmospheric radiation effects - Part 1: Accommodation of atmospheric radiation effects via single event effects within avionics electronic equipment
  • - (6/12/2012) - Guideline for safe operation of medical equipment used for haemodialysis treatments

See for additional information.

Canada – Release of SRSP-310.7, Issue 3

On June 16, 2012, Industry Canada released . Issue 3 of SRSP-310.7 has been released to incorporate policy changes announced in Canada Gazette notice DGTP-013-09, Decision Regarding Spectrum Utilization Policy for the 11 GHz Band. This SRSP replaces SRSP-310.7, Issue 2. The following are the main changes: 1) until January 1, 2026, Industry Canada will not license any new fixed service systems in the band 11.075-11.2 GHz or the band 11.575-11.7 GHz, subject to the provisions in Canada Gazette notice DGTP-013-09 and 2) several other editorial updates and corrections have been made.

Canada – SAR Correction for Measured Conductivity and Relative Permittivity per IEC 62209-2 Standard

Industry Canada’s RSS-102 – RF exposure compliance of radiocommunication apparatus (All frequency Bands) incorporates by reference the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 62209-2 Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Fields from Hand-Held and Body-mounted Wireless Communication Devices – Human Models, Instrumentation, and Procedures – Part 2: Procedure to determine the specific absorption rate (SAR) for wireless communication devices used in close proximity to the human body (frequency range of 30 MHz to 6 GHz)。

Section 6.1.1 of IEC 62209-2 Ed. 1 states:

The measured conductivity and relative permittivity shall be within 10 % of the target values. The measured SAR results shall be corrected using the procedures of Annex F. If the correction ΔSAR has a negative sign, the measured SAR results shall not be corrected.

斗地主达人In Section 6.1.1 of IEC 62209-2, there is currently an error regarding the sign for the correction of SAR. It should read:

If the correction ΔSAR has a positive sign, the measured SAR results shall not be corrected.

The ΔSAR refers to the percent change in SAR relative to the percent change in dielectric properties versus the target values. A negative ΔSAR would translate to a lower measured SAR value than what would be measured if using dielectric properties equal to the target values. A positive ΔSAR would translate to a higher measured SAR value than what would be measured if using dielectric properties equal to the target values. SAR correction shall not be made when the ΔSAR has a positive sign to provide a conservative SAR value. The SAR is only corrected when ΔSAR has a negative sign.

The correction is implemented using Equation 1. The ΔSAR must first be inverted (- to +) when implementing the correction as given in the following example:

Example:

With a measured SAR of 1.00W/Kg and a ΔSAR of -6%, the corrected SAR would be:

Corrected SAR = Measured SAR * ((100 + (ΔSAR x -1)) /100) (Equation 1)

Corrected SAR = 1.00W/Kg * ((100+6)/100) = 1.06 W/Kg

In addition, this notice provides clarification pertaining to Industry Canada’s latest requirements on the SAR correction when the measured conductivity and relative permittivity deviate from the target values.

If the dielectric properties of the tissue simulating liquid are equal or less than 5% of the target values, one of the following actions shall be undertaken:

  • the measurement uncertainty is added to the uncertainty budget, or
  • the SAR value is corrected and the applicable uncertainty contributor associated with the correction formula is added to the uncertainty budget using the procedure of Annex F of IEC 62209-2.

However, if the dielectric properties of the tissue simulating liquid are above 5% but equal or less than 10% of the target values, the SAR value shall be corrected for the deviation in the dielectric properties using the procedures of Annex F of IEC 62209-2 and the uncertainty of the correction formula shall be added to the uncertainty budget.

Singapore – Re-allocation of Spectrum

Singapore’s Infocomm Development Authority(IDA) is currently consulting on the ‘early’ re-allocation of relevant spectrum bands “to enable and encourage investment in 4G systems and the provision of 4G services”. 2.3GHz and 2.5/2.6GHz bands were assigned in 2005 (with some traded in 2009) and expire in 2015. 900MHz and 1800MHz band assignments expire in 2017. While some 4G services have already been launched on existing frequency bands, there are concerns that uncertainty over the future of spectrum may hamper development.

The IDA considered, but decided against, re-allocating the 900MHz band at this stage. 14 lots of paired spectrum (2x5MHz per lot) in the 1800MHz band, eight lots of paired spectrum (2x5MHz per lot) in the 2.5GHz band and six lots of spectrum (10MHz per lot) in the 2.3 GHz and 2.5 GHz bands is proposed for re-allocation for use for either LTE or WiMax. Spectrum caps are proposed, of up to 2x45MHz of spectrum in total for both the 1800MHz and 2.5GHz band paired categories. The consultation also proposes 2x20MHz in the 2.5GHz band for which only new entrants would be eligible to bid – a different reserve price for that spectrum and longer time frames to achieve roll-out for new entrants is also proposed.

2。1GHz spectrum for 3G mobile was awarded in 2001 and additional spectrum issued to the existing holders in 2010, which expires in 2021。 700/800MHz spectrum is unlikely to be available at this stage given ongoing spectrum coordination with neighbouring countries and their timeline for analogue television switch-off。 There are no foreign direct investment limits in relation to telecoms licences held by companies registered in Singapore。

Japan – Revised Labelling Requirements for Radio Devices

Japan’s Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC) recently updated its labeling guidelines to accommodate smaller devices with size restrictions. The new guideline allows for a more simplified label and details are below:

  • Simplification of the Certification number - Under the prior scheme, the label consisted of the CAB code (first three digits), followed by reference to the category of the specified radio (WW) and a 10-digit certification number given by the CAB.

Under the new scheme the category of the specified radio (WW) is no longer required to be printed on the label and the certification number given by the CAB has been reduced from 10 to 6 digits.

  • Use of electronic label – For devices with a screen, such as a phone, the label can be displayed on the screen instead of being printed on a physical label affixed on the device.

These changes are in addition to the recent change which allows CABs to issue a single certification number to cover a product with multiple radios, where separate certification numbers would previously have been granted.

Mexico – New User Manual Statement Requirements

In April 2012, we advised that Mexico had implemented new NOM-121-SCT1-2009 User Manual requirements。 We were recently advised by our local agent that these new User Manual requirements are being more strictly enforced。 Products which feature detachable antennas and/or external amplifiers must immediately meet the requirements detailed below。

An approximate English translation of NOM-121-SCT1-2009:

4.6.3 If the antenna is removable (selectable by the user) the user manual must contain the following information in a conspicuous position:

4.6.3.1 “Este equipo ha sido diseñado para operar con las antenas que enseguida se enlistan y para una ganancia máxima de antena de [x] dB. El uso con este equipo de antenas no incluidas en esta lista o que tengan una ganancia mayor que [x] dB quedan prohibidas. La impedancia requerida de la antena es de [y] ohms”

Translation: “This equipment has been designed to operate with the antennas that are listed below and for maximum antenna gain of {X} dB. Using this device with antennas not included in this list or that may have a gain higher than {X} dB is prohibited. The required antenna impedance is {Y} ohms”

The manufacturer of the device must assign appropriate values for {X} and {Y} in order to comply with that specified in 4.1.4 and with the legal and technical operations provisions that refer.

Agent comments: Section 4.1.4 mandates testing, and testing with the highest gain antenna when multiple antenna options are to be included within the Approval, also EIRP limits of 4W in the 902 – 928MHz and 5725 – 5850MHz bands, 2W for fixed point-to-point in the 2.4GHz band, and 1W for point-to-multipoint applications in the 2.4GHz band. Products that support external amplifiers must meet the limits regardless of amplifier/antenna combination used.

4.6.3.2 A list of all acceptable antennas for use with the transmitter, complying with that specified in 4.1.3. must be included.

Agent comments: Section 4.1.3 mandates testing and Approval of all external amplifiers which can be used with the product being Approved. It prohibits the use of non-tested amplifiers.

4.6.3.3 If the spread spectrum radio-communication equipment has the possibility to use external RF power amplifiers, a list of acceptable amplifiers, that maintain compliance with 4.1.4., must be included in the user instructions.

Taiwan – NCC Revises Technical Specifications

Taiwan’s telecommunications authority, National Communications Commission (NCC), recently revised partial requirements of the following 4 TTE technical specifications:

  • PLMN01 (GSM 900 and DCS1800 Mobile Equipment Technical Specifications)
  • PLMN02 (1900MHz Digital Low Tier PHS Radio Terminal Equipment Technical Specifications)
  • PLMN08 (The Third Generation Mobile Telecommunication Terminal Equipment Technical Specifications)
  • PLMN09 (Subscriber Station for Wireless Broadband Access Type Approval Technical Specification)

Please see below for an overview of the revisions:

  1. If the USB connecting interface of a mobile phone receptacle is neither micro-B nor micro-AB, a specific connection cord set for charge or an adapter is required.
  2. With regard to the connection interface of mobile phone and charger, its flammability class of the insulating material is revised to V-2 at least.
  3. The flammability classes of the cable assemblies is revised to VW-1 at least.
  4. The maximum resistance of cable assemblies is revised to not more than 0.232Ω/m.
  5. The testing report should be issued from a lab accredited by NCC or a lab accredited under a domestic certification system accredited by NCC. SAR testing should be executed according to CNS 14958-1. Its homologous international standards, IEC 62209-1 and IEEE Std 1528, are applicable until June 30th, 2012.
  6. Safety testing should be conducted according to CNS 14336-1.
  7. The complete clauses of the above 4 kinds of technical specifications are available on . (English translations have not yet been provided)

Djibouti – Temporary Import Authorization

The Regulatory Authority in Djibouti, Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication, chargé des Postes et des Télécommunications (MCCPT), recently announced that they are in the process of updating their spectrum management system and will not issue any Type Approvals during this time.

During this interim, MCCPT has advised that temporary import authorizations can be granted to any companies wishing to import their products into the country。 At this time, it is recommended for applicants to submit requests for temporary import along with the relevant technical documentation for MCCPT to review。

 

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