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MultiPoint Newsletter - October 2011 Issue

Dear Colleague,

We have provided typical questions and answers that represent in most cases technical opinions with justification in FCC, IC and CE requirements. The particulars of the product for certification must be considered with respect to the applicability of these questions and answers. We hope you find our update valuable and welcome your feedback if you have any special needs or questions. Call us at 703.689.0368 for your testing requirements. You can view archived issues of MultiPoint at our website.


FCC Labeling Requirements for Tiny Devices

Question: We have a device that is smaller than the palm of one’s hand; as a result we are not able to put the FCC Part 15.19(a)(3) two-part compliance statement on our device. We wish to put the compliance statement in our electronic user’s manual that will be accessible via our web site. Does the FCC allow this?

Answer: 斗地主达人If your device is truly too small, allows the compliance statement to appear on the container in which the device is marketed, or in the user’s manual, in accordance with and Information to the user. Please note that the FCC does not consider a device to be too small to display this statement simply because compliance labels for other countries are taking up all of the space allotted on the device for compliance statements.

The user manual can be a traditional paper booklet or digital medium provided with the device, or it can be made readily-accessible via a web site. The FCC will also allow RF exposure statements to be provided on a web site, including Specific Absorption Rate statements referenced in a user manual, provided the statements point to specific product-related web pages and not general product information pages. SAR statements vary by model and should be product-specific.


FCC Measurement Requirements for LTE

Question: We are designing a Long Term Evolution (LTE) mobile device and would like to know the EMC measurement requirements for LTE operations in the 700 and 800 MHz frequency bands under Part 27 with respect to peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR).

Answer: LTE provides the capability to implement variable bandwidths, selectable from 1.4 to 20 MHz. If you are designing your mobile device to operate in the 700 and 800 MHz frequency bands, it will operate under LTE Band 13. Band 13 was previously used for analog TV broadcasting and was released as a result of the introduction of digital HDTV broadcasting. Along with other bands, it is now specified for Frequency Division Duplex (FDD) operations in which the duplex configuration is reversed such that the uplink frequencies are higher than the downlink frequencies, as shown below in Table 1, LTE FDD Allocation. The uplink/downlink frequency separations are made wide enough to enable the roll-off of antenna filtering to give sufficient attenuation of the transmitted signals within the receive bands. For example, with 777-787 MHz dedicated to the uplink (UL) signal (user equipment (UE) transmit) and 746-756 MHz designated for the downlink (DL) signal (base station transmit), the separation between the bands enables the transmitted signals not to burden the receiver performance; if the signals are too close, the receiver may be "overloaded" and the sensitivity degraded.

There are no requirements for PAPR in this section of the Part 27 rules for Band 13 frequency band of operation。 Part 27 output power limits applicable to LTE operation in Band 13 and several other LTE frequency bands are provided in through Part 27。50(b)(10)。 To demonstrate compliance to the relevant output power limits for Band 13 in particular, Part 27。50(b)(11) requires that the maximum composite power be measured over the full channel bandwidth during a period of continuous transmission, no inclusion of transmitter blanking intervals。

Because LTE provides the capability to implement variable bandwidths within Band 13, selectable from 1.4 to 20 MHz, the possible LTE channel and transmit bandwidth configurations that can be utilized are: 1.4 MHz (1.08 MHz), 3.0 MHz (2.7 MHz), 5.0 MHz (4.5 MHz), or 10.0 MHz (9.0 MHz). Since a single LTE resource block (RB) is 180 kHz wide, the number of RBs associated with each of the above bandwidth configurations is: 6, 15, 25 and 50, respectively. The requirement to measure the output power over the full channel bandwidth would therefore necessitate that the measurements be made over all of the RBs that constitute the transmission bandwidth. Guidance for determining the composite output power over multiple transmitting antennas such as MIMO or beam-forming applications can be found in KDB 662911.


FCC Guidance on Split-Modular Transmitter

Question: We are designing a modular transmitter to meet the FCC’s definition of a single modular transmitter. The transmitter is completely self-contained and is only missing an input signal, non-volatile memory and a power source to make it functional. The non-volatile memory typically contains the modular transmitter’s firmware with specific Radio Frequency (RF) parameters that are necessary for proper operation, however our modular transmitter’s non-volatile memory function will be provided by the device that is hosting it. We will provide our modular transmitter’s RF parameter data to the host manufacturers, for installation in the non-volatile memory of their host devices, which will in turn provide the RF parameters for our modular transmitters. We will also provide calibration data to the host device manufacturers so that final factory calibration can be performed on our modular transmitters. Will such a device be accepted as a modular transmitter for FCC certification?

Answer: The modular transmitter that you describe should fall under the FCC’s split-modular transmitter category, where the radio control resides on an external processor which is on the host. As a result, the modular transmitter’s RF parameters have to be included in the non-volatile memory of the host device firmware. Splitting the transmitter’s functions between the host and the module, and installing the RF parameters in such a manner, could result in their modification by the host manufacturer, which naturally would be of concern to the FCC. The modular transmitter in your description could also fall under the FCC’s Software Defined Radio (SDR) category since it does not contain its own non-volatile memory to store its RF parameters, but instead is dependent on a host device to provide this function.

Alternatively, the FCC’s Transmitter Module Equipment Authorization Guide, KDB 996369, states that a device approved under single modular approval must be completely self-contained, have physically delineated components for which compliance can be demonstrated independent of the host operating conditions, and comply with all eight requirements of . The FCC’s definition of a modular transmitter, per Note 3 found on page 2 of KDB 996369, states the following: “A module generally consists of a completely self-contained transmitter that is missing only an input signal and power source to make it functional. A module is designed to be incorporated into another device, such as a personal computer, personal digital assistant (PDA) or utility meter.”

For this and the reasons cited previously, the FCC should consider your design a spilt-modular transmitter and possibly a SDR, and will most likely request a detailed review of your design through its Permit but Ask (PBA) policy before approving it. Please note that TCBs are not allowed to approve split-modular transmitters or SDRs.


EU Modular Approval Policy

Question: We design modular devices for the European market; is there any guidance with respect to how we should test our modular devices for this market?

Answer: Europe does not have an “official” modular approval policy like the FCC, mainly due to the complexities of testing an unenclosed module for safety and immunity requirements as required by the R&TTE Directive. Typically to perform safety and immunity testing, the module needs to be in some sort of a “typical enclosure” because most safety requirements include tests that are dependent upon an enclosure, i.e. the Electro-Static Discharge (ESD) immunity test, which really can’t be performed on a module without an enclosure. The “typical enclosure” approach enables you to test and declare compliance in the “typical enclosure” used during testing. However, if you embed the module in another host that has additional circuitry, you would have to again investigate safety, immunity, and emissions. The R&TTE Compliance Association provides guidance on modular devices in a document available via the link 斗地主达人TGN 01 Rev 4.


Standards Updates

EU: NEW CENELEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the CENELEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (10/14/2011) - Environmental testing - Part 2-83: Tests - Test Tf: Solderability testing of electronic components for surface mounting devices (SMD) by the wetting balance method using solder paste
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 1: General requirements for basic safety and essential performance
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-2: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of high frequency surgical equipment and high frequency surgical accessories
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-19: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of infant incubators
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-20: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of infant transport incubators
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-21: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of infant radiant warmers
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-29: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of radiotherapy simulators
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-33: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of magnetic resonance equipment for medical diagnosis
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-37: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of ultrasonic medical diagnostic and monitoring equipment
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-39: Particular requirements for basic safety and essential performance of peritoneal dialysis equipment
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-41: Particular requirements for basic safety and essential performance of surgical luminaires and luminaires for diagnosis
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-44: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of X-ray equipment for computed tomography
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-50: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of infant phototherapy equipment
  • - (10/14/2011) - Fire hazard testing - Part 6-2: Smoke obscuration - Summary and relevance of test methods
  • - (10/14/2011) - Fire hazard testing - Part 7-2: Toxicity of fire effluent - Summary and relevance of test methods
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-58: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of lens removal devices and vitrectomy devices for ophthalmic surgery
  • - (10/14/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-35: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of heating devices using blankets, pads and mattresses and intended for heating in medical use
  • - (10/21/2011) - Cable trunking systems and cable ducting systems for electrical installations - Part 2-1: Cable trunking systems and cable ducting systems intended for mounting on walls and ceilings

See CENELEC for additional information.

EU: NEW ETSI STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new ETSI standards published during the past month:

  • - (September 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 1: Common technical requirements
  • - (September 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Portable Very High Frequency (VHF) radiotelephone equipment for the maritime mobile service operating in the VHF bands with integrated handheld class D DSC; Part 2: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (September 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Portable Very High Frequency (VHF) radiotelephone equipment for the maritime mobile service operating in the VHF bands with integrated handheld class D DSC; Part 3: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.3(e) of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (September 2011) - Advanced Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (A-SMGCS); Part 6: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive for deployed surface movement radar sensors; Sub-part 1: X-band sensors using pulsed signals and transmitting power up to 100 kW
  • - (September 2011) - VHF air-ground Digital Link (VDL) Mode 4 radio equipment; Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for ground-based equipment; Part 2: General description and data link layer
  • - (September 2011) - VHF air-ground Digital Link (VDL) Mode 4 radio equipment; Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for ground-based equipment; Part 3: Additional broadcast aspects
  • - (October 2011) - Environmental Engineering (EE) Measurement Method for Energy Efficiency of Wireless Access Network Equipment.

See 斗地主达人ETSI website斗地主达人 for additional information.

EU: NEW IEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new IEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (9/29/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-31: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of external cardiac pacemakers with internal power source
  • - (9/28/2011) - IECEx Test Report for IEC 60079-11 (2006) ed 5.0 - Explosive atmospheres - Part 11: Equipment protection by intrinsic safety "i"
  • - (10/6/2011) - Information technology -- Radio frequency identification device performance test methods -- Part 1: Test methods for system performance
  • - (10/20/2011) - Amendment 1 - Identification cards -- Contactless integrated circuit cards -- Proximity cards -- Part 2: Radio frequency power and signal interface - Limits of electromagnetic disturbance levels parasitically generated by the PICC
  • - (10/19/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-25: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of electrocardiographs
  • - (10/19/2011) - Safety of laser products - Part 13: Measurements for classification of laser products
  • - (10/14/2011) - Amendment 1 - Identification cards -- Contactless integrated circuit cards -- Proximity cards -- Part 3: Initialization and anticollision - Electromagnetic disturbance handling and single-size unique identifier
  • - (10/13/2011) - Corrigendum 2 - Low-voltage electrical installations - Part 4-44: Protection for safety - Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances
  • - (10/13/2011) - Corrigendum 2 - Specification for radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus and methods - Part 1-1: Radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus - Measuring apparatus
  • - (10/13/2011) - Specification for radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus and methods - ALL PARTS

斗地主达人See for additional information。

EU: UPDATED LIST OF HARMONIZED STANDARDS (R&TTE DIRECTIVE)

On September 21, 2011, an updated consolidated list of harmonized standards in the framework of the RTTE Directive (1999/5/EC) was published in the Official Journal of the European Union。  

FCC – Forum on Indoor Deployments of Small Cell Sites

On October 28, 2011, the FCC will host a forum on indoor deployments of small cell sites.   The forum topics are as follows:

  • Overview of small cell technologies currently available and those to be available in the near future.  These technologies include software defined radios and enhanced Wi-Fi in both licensed and unlicensed spectrum.
  • Discussion of the business opportunities and challenges involved in expanding wireless data coverage.
  • Assessment of the potential economic impact of small cell deployments, particularly with respect to job creation and explore possible policy approaches.

斗地主达人The FCC Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, in conjunction with the FCC’s Technical Advisory Committee Small Cell working group and Spectrum Task Force is organizing this forum.  The forum will be held on October 28, 2011 from 10:45 AM – 3:00 PM EDT at 445 12th St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20554, Commission Meeting Room.  

Canada – Release of CB-01, Issue 4; CB-02, Issue 6; DES-CB, Issue 3; and DES-LAB(E), Issue 5

On October 8, 2011, Industry Canada released the following documents:

  • CB-01, Issue 4,
  • CB-02, Issue 6,
  • DES-CB, Issue 3,
  • DES-LAB(E), Issue 5,

The following changes have been introduced:

  • CB-01, Issue 4, has been updated to apply to both Canadian and foreign certification bodies (CBs), by moving existing requirements for foreign CBs from REC-CB into CB-01. This update consolidates the recognition procedures in a single document. With the release of this update, CB-01 will supersede REC-CB.
  • The Cross-Reference Checklist table, formerly in Appendix II of CB-01, Issue 3, has been moved to Annex A of CB-02, Issue 6. This will allow updates to CB-02 in the future without affecting CB-01. The table has also been updated with regard to the changes introduced in CB-02, Issue 6.
  • The product audit section of CB-02, Issue 6, has been updated to provide clarifications on audit requirements. This update clarifies how to calculate the number of products to be targeted for audit by the certification bodies within a calendar year.
  • References to ISO/IEC standards have been changed from specific editions to the latest editions in all the above documents.
  • Contact information for Industry Canada has been updated in all the above documents.

These documents are in effect as of October 8, 2011.

Mexico – Laboratory Accreditation

Following the publication of NOM-121-SCT1-2009, one Mexican laboratory is now accredited for testing。    Because of this, NOM-121 is now enforced and “in-country” testing is required to approve products in the  following bands:  2。400 – 2。4835 GHz,  5。725 – 5。850 GHz, and  902 – 928 MHz。    However, it is expected that the Mutual Recognition Agreement between Mexico and the USA will soon come into play and COFETEL will then accept tests performed by recognized U。S。 laboratories for Type Approval。  COFETEL is still defining the audit requirements for U。S。 laboratories and until that is resolved, “in-country” testing will be required。

FCC Mandates GPS For All Phones By 2018

This The FCC recently mandated that by 2018, all operators (including voice-over-IP service providers) must integrate GPS into their handsets. This move designed to enable first responders to more accurately pinpoint the location of 911 emergency calls.

斗地主达人Based on current adoption rates, the FCC estimates that even without the new rules, 85 percent of mobile phone users will carry GPS-capable devices by the 2018 cutoff date, effectively minimizing compliance concerns。 In addition, the FCC did not establish a sunset deadline for phasing out handsets without GPS integration–at present, officials must rely on triangulation between cell towers to determine the location of 911 calls from phones without GPS。

Currently, mobile operator networks are required to provide the location of 911 calls via GPS or tower triangulation, but VoIP-based 911 calls are treated like landline calls because many subscriber handsets are leftovers from landline services. The advent of mobile-enabled VoIP services is behind the FCC’s rule change: In the event of a 911 call, the registered location may not necessarily correspond with the caller’s physical whereabouts, a discrepancy which becomes even more significant if the caller should become incapacitated.  

Japan – Measurements Above 1 GHz Now Required

As of October 1, 2011, VCCI’s requirement for radiated EMI measurements above 1 GHz goes into effect.  This requirement originally went into effect on October 1, 2010; however the VCCI Council established a 1-year grace period to assist manufacturers in avoiding potential technical barriers to trade.   This grace period has now expired and all VCCI members are required to comply.

For more testing details, please refer VCCI Council Rules (April 2011), Normative Annex1. Technical Requirement (V-3/2011.04), 4.3.2 Limits for radiated disturbance (Above 1GHz), Conditional testing procedure.

Additional References:, and

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