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MultiPoint Newsletter - July 2011 Issue

Dear Colleague,

We have provided typical questions and answers that represent in most cases technical opinions with justification in FCC, IC and CE requirements. The particulars of the product for certification must be considered with respect to the applicability of these questions and answers. We hope you find our update valuable and welcome your feedback if you have any special needs or questions. Call us at 703.689.0368 for your testing requirements. You can view archived issues of MultiPoint at our website.


FCC Rules for Testing Tablet Computers

Question: We are designing a tablet computer and would like to know whether we can use the minimum test configuration specified in ANSI C63.4 clause 11.5 to configure and test our device for FCC certification.

Answer: Because a tablet computer does not possess the many ports that are typical of laptop, desktop/tower and netbook computers, the minimum configuration specified in ANSI C63. 4 may not be applicable. A more appropriate test configuration for a tablet computer would be for each of its input, output and dock connectors to be connected to a representative, normal-use peripheral device. Please note that the dock connectors in many tablet computers have additional input/output port capability. When this is the case, the dock connectors should be interfaced with peripherals that provide the proper terminating port impedance.

The test report you submit to support your tablet computer application for FCC certification must include your justification for the test configuration and loading of the input/output ports。 The FCC is the arbiter for its rules, regulations and policies; before performing any certification testing, we would strongly recommend that you or your test laboratory submit a Knowledge Database () inquiry to the FCC to verify the acceptability of the test configuration you have selected for your tablet computer。


FCC Rules for Installing Certified Modules

Question: We manufacture a product that includes a modular transmitter from a vendor that has certified the module. What is our responsibility with respect to FCC certification to use this module?

Answer: Typically when a modular transmitter is approved by the FCC, the grant contains conditions and limitations for its use. In addition, the manufacturer of the modular device must provide instructions on the installation and use of its modular transmitter as stipulated on the grant. If you follow these instructions, you can integrate the module inside your product without any further FCC approval, provided your host product meets applicable FCC rules (for example, digital unintentional emissions per FCC Part 15B). It’s important to note that grant conditions can include Radio Frequency (RF) hazard requirements, such as minimum safe separation distance from the user and nearby persons, transmitter co-location statements, additional FCC certification, etc., with which your product must comply.

To clarify its policies, the FCC recently released the “Transmitter Module Equipment Authorization Guide”, 996369 D01 Module Certification Guide v01r03.

The FCC has published in several documents its specific labeling requirements for hosts that contain a certified modular transmitter, and in fact this information should be included by the manufacturer in his modular installation and use instructions. One place for guidance on this topic is Section 8 in “Guidelines for Labeling and User Information for Devices Subject to Part 15 and Part 18”, 784748 D01 Labeling Part 15 18 Guidelines v07.


FCC Requirements for PTT and Re-farmed Part 90 Frequencies

Question: We design Push-to-Talk Radios (PTT), and with the compliance deadline not that far off, we would like to know if the VHF and UHF itinerant frequencies are subject to the FCC’s requirement for Re-farming Part 90 frequencies.

Answer: Re-farming is the informal term the FCC uses to describe “narrowbanding” from a large channel spacing to a smaller one. The FCC’s Re-farming policy affects itinerant frequencies in the VHF and UHF band, specifically the frequencies that fall within 150-174 MHz (VHF) and 421 to 512 MHz (UHF). If your PTT operates on these frequencies, it’s very likely to be impacted by the Re-farming policies.

Some of the itinerant frequencies that were referred to as color dot channels were moved from to the Multi Use Radio Service (MURS) under 。 The frequencies that remain under Part 90 were repurposed as narrowband bandwidth channels in the Re-farming process as follows:

  1. The frequency 151.640 MHz is limited to 6.25 kHz operations, while frequencies 151.5125, 151.700, 151.760, 154.5275 and 158.4075 MHz are limited to 12.5 kHz channel bandwidth operations.
  2. The two remaining itinerant channels, 151.505 and 158.400 MHz in the high VHF band are subject to the narrowband rules; PTT radios with these frequencies must comply with the Re-farming narrowband requirement by January 1, 2013.
  3. The remaining itinerant channels in the high VHF band were moved to the MURS. Under FCC , the frequencies 151.820, 151.880 and 151.940 MHz are authorized for 12.5 kHz channel bandwidth, while frequencies 154.570 and 154.600 MHz are authorized for 25 kHz channel bandwidth.

斗地主达人FCC grandfathers previously granted 47 CFR Part 90 licenses to operate on MURS frequencies now under 47 CFR Part 95.632, moved from Part 90 during the Re-farming process. The rule specifically states, “Stations that were licensed under Part 90 of the FCC's rules to operate on MURS frequencies as of November 13, 2000, are granted a license by rule that authorizes continued operations under the terms of such nullified Part 90 authorizations, including any rule waivers.”

斗地主达人Therefore, if your VHF radio operated on 25 kHz MURS channel bandwidth spacing before November 13, 2000, it may continue wideband operation, and all stations (PTT radios) may operate using 25 kHz channel bandwidth spacing on 154。570 and 154。600 MHz。 However, the UHF itinerant channels, namely 451。800, 456。800, 464。500, 464。500, 469。500 and 469。550 MHz, were not moved to the MURS and therefore are subject to the FCC’s narrowband Re-farming policy, with a compliance deadline of January 1, 2013。

The remaining UHF itinerant channels were also repurposed as narrowband channels in the FCC’s Re-farming process, though these channels have always been subject to narrowband use; 451。80625, 451。81875, 456。80625, and 456。81875 MHz are limited to 6。25 kHz operations, and 451。8125 and 456。8125 MHz are limited to 12。5 kHz operations。

For more information on this topic, please refer to the documents 斗地主达人FCC Narrowbanding Mandate Guide and General_Information on VHF-UHF Narrowbanding斗地主达人, from the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.


FCC Fee Schedule for TCB Excluded Devices

Question: We manufacture products that are on the FCC’s TCB exclusion list and as a result, our TCB cannot process the applications for certification. What is the FCC’s current fee schedule for processing applications, including maintaining the confidentiality of our proprietary technical documents?

Answer: The FCC published a new Schedule of Charges on May 20, 2011; the chart below shows the FCC’s fee schedule effective June 21, 2011.


Standards Updates

EU: NEW CENELEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

斗地主达人This is a shortened list of the CENELEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (6/17/2011) - Alarm systems - Part 4: Electromagnetic compatibility - Product family standard: Immunity requirements for components of fire, intruder, hold up, CCTV, access control and social alarm systems
  • - (6/17/2011) - Alarm systems - Part 4: Electromagnetic compatibility - Product family standard: Immunity requirements for components of fire, intruder, hold up, CCTV, access control and social alarm systems
  • - (6/17/2011) - Alarm systems - Part 5: Environmental test methods
  • - (6/20/2011) - Integrated circuits - Measurement of electromagnetic immunity - Part 8: Measurement of radiated immunity - IC stripline method
  • - (6/20/2011) - Radiation protection instrumentation - Alarming personal radiation devices (PRD) for detection of illicit trafficking of radioactive material
  • - (6/24/2011) - Guide on Membership Criteria of CEN and CENELEC
  • - (6/24/2011) - Power line communication apparatus used in low voltage installations - Radio disturbance characteristics - Limits and methods of measurement - Part 1: Apparatus for in-home use
  • - (6/27/2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility - Requirements for household appliances, electric tools and similar apparatus - Part 1: Emission
  • - (6/27/2011) - Limits and methods of measurement of radio disturbance characteristics of electrical lighting and similar equipment
  • - (7/8/2011) - Specification for radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus and methods - Part 2-1: Methods of measurement of disturbances and immunity - Conducted disturbance measurements
  • - (7/8/2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility - Product family standard for audio, video, audio-visual and entertainment lighting control apparatus for professional use - Part 2: Immunity
  • - (7/8/2011) - Cable networks for television signals, sound signals and interactive services - Part 2: Electromagnetic compatibility for equipment
  • - (7/8/2011) - Lamp control gear - Part 2-3: Particular requirements for a.c. and/or d.c. supplied electronic control gear for fluorescent lamps
  • - (7/11/2011) - Integrated circuits - Measurement of electromagnetic emissions - Part 8: Measurement of radiated emissions - IC stripline method
  • - (7/15/2011) - Secondary cells and batteries containing alkaline or other non-acid electrolytes - Portable sealed rechargeable single cells - Part 2: Nickel-metal hydride
  • - (7/15/2011) - Radiation protection instrumentation - Installed radiation monitors for the detection of radioactive and special nuclear materials at national borders

See for additional information。

EU: NEW IEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new IEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (6/29/2011) - Amendment 1 - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-31: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of external cardiac pacemakers with internal power source
  • - (7/12/2011) - Amendment 2 - Electromagnetic compatibility - Requirements for household appliances, electric tools and similar apparatus - Part 1: Emission
  • - (6/28/2011) - Corrigendum 1 - Arc welding equipment - Part 10: Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements
  • - (7/8/2011) - Electrical safety in low voltage distribution systems up to 1 000 V a.c. and 1 500 V d.c. - Equipment for testing, measuring or monitoring of protective measures - Part 13: Hand-held and hand-manipulated current clamps and sensors for measurement of leakage currents in electrical distribution systems
  • - (6/30/2011) - Explosive atmospheres - Part 11: Equipment protection by intrinsic safety "i"
  • - (7/8/2011) - Interpretation sheet 1 to amendment 1 - Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 6-3: Generic standards - Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments
  • - (7/8/2011) - Interpretation sheet 1 to amendment 1 - Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 6-4: Generic standards - Emission standard for industrial environments
  • - (6/22/2011) - Low voltage power supplies, d.c. output - Part 3: Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)
  • - (6/28/2011) - Radio data system (RDS) - Receiver products and characteristics - Methods of measurement
  • - (6/29/2011) - Safety of laser products - Part 4: Laser guards

See for additional information。

EU: NEW ETSI STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new ETSI standards published during the past month:

  • - (June 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Test Report Template for testing to EN 300 220-2 V2.3.1 (R&TTE)
  • - (June 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); SRD radar equipment using Wideband Low Activity Mode (WLAM) and operating in the frequency range from 24,05 GHz to 24,50 GHz; System Reference Document
  • - (June 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Conformance testing for Mode 1 of the digital Private Mobile Radio (dPMR); Part 1: Protocol Implementation Conformance Statement (PICS) proforma
  • - (June 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); digital Private Mobile Radio (dPMR); Part 3: Requirements catalogue
  • - (June 2011) - LTE; Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access (E-UTRA); Base Station (BS) and repeater ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) (3GPP TS 36.113 version 10.3.0 Release 10)
  • - (June 2011) - LTE; Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access (E-UTRA); Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements for mobile terminals and ancillary equipment (3GPP TS 36.124 version 10.2.0 Release 10)
  • - (June 2011) - Digital cellular telecommunications system (Phase 2+); Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS); LTE; E-UTRA, UTRA and GSM/EDGE; Multi-Standard Radio (MSR) Base Station (BS) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) (3GPP TS 37.113 version 10.2.0 Release 10)
  • - (July 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Citizens' Band (CB) radio equipment; Part 1: Technical characteristics and methods of measurement
  • - (July 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Citizens' Band (CB) radio equipment; Part 2: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (July 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Road Transport and Traffic Telematics (RTTT); Short range radar equipment operating in the 24,05 GHz to 24,25 GHz frequency range for automotive application; Part 1: Technical characteristics and test methods
  • - (July 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Road Transport and Traffic Telematics (RTTT); Short range radar equipment operating in the 24,05 GHz to 24,25 GHz frequency range for automotive application; Part 2: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (July 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Radio equipment to be used in the 40 GHz to 246 GHz frequency range; Part 1: Technical characteristics and test methods
  • - (July 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Radio equipment to be used in the 40 GHz to 246 GHz frequency range; Part 2: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (July 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); SRD radar equipment using Wideband Low Activity Mode (WLAM) and operating in the frequency range from 24,05 GHz to 24,50 GHz; System Reference Document

斗地主达人See for additional information.

US: FCC PLANS FOR LOW POWER FM RADIO

On July 12, 2011, the FCC released a detailing plans to pursue new rules to expand non-commercial, low-power radio in major U。S。 urban areas。  Earlier this year, legislation was signed allowing for the expansion of low-power FM radio。  However, no channels may have existed for new applicants in many major urban areas because of competition between service for the channels, with debate centered on balancing the licensing of translator - or repeater FM stations - and LPFM service。

An application window for new LPFM stations could open as early as summer 2012。  The applications for new translators–which are low-powered stations that may only rebroadcast the signal of a full-power station–would be processed for small markets and rural communities。   Additionally, the FCC suggested a “floor” specifying a minimum number of LPFM frequencies that must remain available in a market in order for translator applications to be processed and awarded。

CANADA: SPECTRUM POLICY CHANGE FOR  25.25 – 28.35 GHz BAND

斗地主达人On June 30, 2011, Industry Canada released which details the following recent decisions on the use of the band 25。25-28。35 GHz by fixed radio systems:

  • Allowance of fixed radio systems to be deployed in the band 25.25-26.5 GHz, with a mix of FDD and TDD operation. (details to be established during the development of the SRSP)
  • Allowance of fixed radio systems with FDD and/or TDD operation to be deployed in the band 27.5-28.35 GHz. (details to be established during the development of the SRSP)
  • 26.5-27.5 Band GHz will be subject to future review.

Industry Canada plans to establish of cross-border arrangements with the United States for use of the band 25。25-26。5 GHz to ensure continued protection of fixed systems in Canada, update as necessary, and  revise the accordingly。

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