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MultiPoint Newsletter - June 2011 Issue

Dear Colleague,

We have provided typical questions and answers that represent in most cases technical opinions with justification in FCC, IC and CE requirements. The particulars of the product for certification must be considered with respect to the applicability of these questions and answers. We hope you find our update valuable and welcome your feedback if you have any special needs or questions. Call us at 703.689.0368 for your testing requirements. You can view archived issues of MultiPoint at our website.


FCC Rules for Adding a Licensed Device to an Existing Unlicensed FCC ID

Question: We manufacture a wireless mobile router that supports the 5 GHz U-NII (Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure) band and the 4.9 GHz FCC licensed public safety band. The original testing and certification of the U-NII band was done with the 4.9 GHz public safety band disabled through firmware. The wireless mobile router is electrically identical as tested for the original certification, no changes have been made. Can we now do the following?

  1. Enable the public safety band such that we can operate both bands under the current FCC ID, performing the required testing and submitting a Class II Permissive change (C2PC) for review and approval, or
  2. Test the 4.9 GHz public safety band only to certify a new FCC ID under the FCC’s licensed modular approval policy. The result would be two different FCC ID’s on the wireless mobile router, FCC ID 1 and FCC ID 2, for purposes of this question.

Answer: Based on the information provided, we would advise you as follows, however the FCC is the final arbiter of its rules, regulations and policies and we would encourage you to seek their guidance before setting a final strategy:

  1. You cannot utilize the C2PC process to obtain approval to enable the licensed band under the current FCC ID 1; you will need another FCC ID, FCC ID 2. However, even with FCC ID 2 certified, you cannot display both FCC ID 1 and FCC ID 2 on your wireless mobile router unless you test and certify both the U-NII and public safety bands for FCC ID 2. However, you can affix FCC ID 1 to the module when it’s configured to operate on the unlicensed band with thelicensed band under FCC ID 2 deactivated, or you can affix FCC ID 2 for the licensed band while deactivating FCC ID 1 for the unlicensed band. In this two ID scenario, the appropriate FCC ID must be affixed to the module based on the configured operating band.
  2. You can test and apply for certification for FCC ID 2 with both bands active, allowing the bands to be switched via firmware control, so that both bands are allowed under FCC ID 2. The issue of simultaneous transmission with respect to RF hazards, etc. would have to be considered during testing and certification.

FCC Guidance for Listing Frequency Ranges on Grants

Question: What guidance or information does the FCC provide on listing frequency ranges on grants for transmitters subject to certification?

Answer: The FCC recently released an explanatory document, 634817 D01 Freq Range Listing for Grants v02r02斗地主达人, to provide guidance on this issue for Part 15 Unlicensed devices and licensed transmitters. Below are just a few of the relevant points:

Part 15 devices:
  • Device frequency ranges must agree with the Part 15 rule under which certification is sought.
  • Restricted bands must not be listed in Section 15.205 except for certain devices as allowed in .
  • The center frequency of the lowest channel to the center frequency of the highest channel must be listed.
Licensed transmitters:
  • Only the allowed frequencies for the rule part for which certification is sought may be listed.
  • Contiguous frequency ranges that extend allowed frequencies, including adjacent frequencies outside the rule part under which certification is sought, are allowed under certain conditions.

FCC Filing Information Requirements for DFS Devices

Question: What additional Form 731 filing information, not specified in Section 8, DFS Test Report Guidelines, in MO&O FCC 06-96斗地主达人 (DFS Order), is required in order for a DFS device to be approved as a U-NII client device operating in the 5.25 - 5.35 GHz and 5.45 - 5.725 GHz bands, without radar detection capability?

Answer: Devices to be approved as U-NII clients need to show compliance with the general requirements of , in addition to the technical requirements of . According to the requirements of Section 15.202, a client device must rely on a master device to initiate a network if the client device does not have radar detection capability. The client device cannot initiate, or be configured to initiate, any transmissions including transmissions from probes or beacons, nor can it support ad-hoc modes of operation. Operating a device as a Group Owner for Wi-Fi Direct* in the referenced bands is therefore limited to only where it is approved as a master according to the requirements of Section 15.202 (see KDB # 594280, 594280 D01 Software Configuration Control v01r01).

The following is a list of required items (list may not be all-inclusive):

  1. Complete test report for client device without radar detection, as described in Section 8 (DFS Test Report Guidelines) in the DFS Order (FCC 06-96).
  2. Test report attachment for the client operating in an associated mode that includes documentation for the following:
    • Test results demonstrating an associated client link is established with the master on a test frequency;
    • The client and DFS-certified master device are associated, and a movie can be streamed as specified in the DFS Order for a non-occupancy period test;
    • The test frequency has been monitored to ensure no transmission of any type has occurred for 30 minutes. Note that if the client moves with the master, the device is considered compliant if nothing appears in the client non-occupancy period test. For devices that shut down (rather than moving channels), no beacons should appear;
    • An analyzer plot that contains a single 30-minute sweep on the original channel.
  3. Complete User’s Manual and/or Professional Installers Manual; if the manual is not complete at the time of application, upload an updated User’s Manual exhibit when completed.
  4. Statement of Conformity for the Client in Non-Associated mode; this Cover Letter exhibit should state that the client software and associated drivers will not initiate any transmission on DFS frequencies without initiation by a master; this includes restrictions on transmissions for beacons and support for ad-hoc peer-to-peer modes.
  5. Channel/frequency plan showing the channels that have active scanning or passive scanning. With active scanning, the device can transmit a probe (beacon); with passive scanning the device can listen only without probes.
  6. Software and operational description that explains how the software and/or hardware is implemented to ensure that the designated operations mode cannot be modified by an end user or an installer for client devices that have software configuration control to operate in different modes (active scanning in some and passive scanning in others), or in different bands (devices with multiple equipment classes or those that operate on non-DFS frequencies), or modular devices that configure the modes of operation through software.
  7. Attestation letter stating that the device complies with the requirements for software configuration control as discussed in KDB # 594280.

*   Wi-Fi Direct is a Wi-Fi Alliance certification program that defines a new specification for Wi-Fi devices to connect to one another, quickly and conveniently enabling direct connection groups to do things like print, sync, and share content, even when an access point or router is unavailable. Connections will work at typical Wi-Fi speeds and range, protected by WPA2™-certified security protocols and include WMM® Quality of Service mechanisms. The Wi-Fi Direct mark that indicates the implementation of this new specification can only be used by Wi-Fi Alliance member companies.


FCC Rules for Corporate Name Changes of Grantees

Question: We have some FCC administrative questions due to a recent merger with another company that has resulted in a change in our company name.

  1. If a company changed its name due to a merger, what happens with the FCC certificates under the company’s old name?
  2. Which of the situations below would apply?
    • Need to have ONE application to change the company name at the FCC
    • Need to amend/new application for every certified model

Answer: If a company’s name (or address, or contact name, etc.) changes, its FCC Grantee Code and FCC FRN should be updated as soon as possible. The FCC Grantee Code is the first three characters of the FCC ID, and is used by the FCC as the primary company identifier so it is very important that the FCC Grantee Code database accurately reflect your company information. At the same time, the FCC FRN is part of the FCC Commission Registration Systems (CORES), and is required for any company who wishes to do business with the FCC, such as having products certified for sale. It’s important that the FCC FRN database be accurate, but it’s not nearly as important as the accuracy of the Grantee Code database.

When the FCC Grantee Code database update is completed, the FCC database of certified products will reflect the new company name for products with the Grantee Code(s) submitted. The FCC ID’s will not be changed, but the company name associated with the first three characters (Grantee Code) of the FCC ID’s will be changed.

To update the FCC Grantee Code

In order to submit any Grantee Code changes to the FCC, you must know the “Grantee Code Registration Number” (GC Number) assigned to the company’s FCC Grantee Code. In April 2005 the FCC began to assign a GC Number to each Grantee Code registered, and they also assigned a GC Number for each Grantee Code registered prior to April 2005.

  1. If the GC Number associated with the company’s FCC Grantee Code is unknown, the first thing that must be done is for the company to request the “GC Number” by emailing easadmin@fcc.gov, and providing the 1) Grantee Code, 2) Contact Name, and 3) Email Address. Ideally this will be done by the named contact in the FCC Grantee Code database.
  2. When the FCC replies with the GC Number you must to go to update the Grantee Code database.
  3. Enter the GC Number and the Grantee Code as requested on the screen, and then select the middle box, “Change Name, Including Address and/or Contact”. Follow the prompts.
  4. For company name changes, as instructed, attach a cover letter on company letterhead (with new company name) that includes a description of the company name changes (old name and new names), and a brief explanation why the company name has changed.  You can include Contact Name, Address, Phone Number and Email Address updates as well.
  5. The FCC may require additional information or clarification during the process. You may not be notified when the change has been processed.
  6. Remember to archive the GC Number for future reference.
To Update the FCC FRN

斗地主达人Go to: 。 Select the middle box, “Update your Registration Information”。 You must enter the FRN and the password。 If you do not know the password, follow the instructions on the screen to obtain a password。  Once the password has been obtained, the FRN updates can be submitted。 Archive the FRN password for future reference。

Industry Canada

If the company also has products certified for sale in Canada, the Industry Canada (IC) Company Number (CN) database should also be updated. The IC CN is similar to the FCC Grantee Code in that it is the first part of the IC ID that appears on certified products for sale in Canada, and is the primary identifier of your company to Industry Canada, so clearly it should accurately reflect your company information.

斗地主达人To update your company IC CN entry in the database, IC now requires the use of their , which requires a quick and simple online registration process (if the company is not already registered), followed by some additional online interaction.


Standards Updates

EU: NEW CENELEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the CENELEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (5/20/2011) - Luminaires - Part 2-3: Particular requirements - Luminaires for road and street lighting
  • - (5/27/2011) - Audio, video and multimedia systems - General channel assignment of multichannel audio
  • - (5/27/2011) - Fibre optic interconnecting devices and passive components - Performance standard - Part 141-2: Fibre optic passive chromatic dispersion compensator using single-mode dispersion compensating fibre for category C - Controlled environments
  • - (6/10/2011) - Connectors for electronic equipment - Tests and measurements - Part 8-2: Static load tests (fixed connectors) - Test 8b: Static load, axial
  • - (6/10/2011) - Connectors for electronic equipment - Part 7-1: Detail specification for 8-way, shielded, free and fixed connectors
  • - (6/10/2011) - Connectors for electronic equipment - Tests and measurements - Part 9-4: Endurance tests - Test 9d: Durability of contact retention system and seals (maintenance, ageing)
  • - (6/10/2011) - Connectors for electronic equipment - Tests and measurements - Part 8-3: Static load tests (fixed connectors) - Test 8c: Robustness of actuating lever
  • - (6/10/2011) - Connectors for electronic equipment - Tests and measurements - Part 17-2: Cable clamping tests - Test 17b: Cable clamp resistance to cable rotation
  • - (6/10/2011) - Communication networks and systems for power utility automation - Part 4: System and project management

See for additional information。

EU: NEW IEC STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new IEC standards published during the past month:

  • - (5/19/2011) - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-34: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of invasive blood pressure monitoring equipment
  • - (5/19/2011) - Determination of RF field strength and SAR in the vicinity of radiocommunication base stations for the purpose of evaluating human exposure
  • - (5/19/2011) - Amendment 2 - Household and similar electrical appliances - Safety - Part 2-37: Particular requirements for commercial electric doughnut fryers and deep fat fryers
  • - (5/25/2011) - Connectors for electronic equipment - Tests and measurements - Part 26-100: Measurement setup, test and reference arrangements and measurements for connectors according to IEC 60603-7 - Tests 26a to 26g
  • - (5/25/2011) - Secondary cells and batteries containing alkaline or other non-acid electrolytes - Portable sealed rechargeable single cells - Part 2: Nickel-metal hydride
  • - (5/26/2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 2-5: Environment - Description and classification of electromagnetic environments
  • - (5/27/2011) - Case studies supporting IEC 62232 - Determination of RF field strength and SAR in the vicinity of radiocommunication base stations for the purpose of evaluating human exposure
  • - (6/8/2011) - Specification for radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus and methods - ALL PARTS
  • - (6/8/2011) - Specification for radio disturbance and immunity measuring apparatus and methods - Part 4-2: Uncertainties, statistics and limit modelling - Measurement instrumentation uncertainty
  • - (6/8/2011) - Corrigendum 1 - Fibre optic interconnecting devices and passive components - Basic test and measurement procedures - Part 2-12: Tests - Impact
  • - (6/10/2011) - Corrigendum 2 - Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-54: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of X-ray equipment for radiography and radioscopy
  • - (6/10/2011) - Liquid crystal display devices - Part 6-2: Measuring methods for liquid crystal display modules - Reflective type
  • - (6/10/2011) - Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems - Digital interfaces - Part 450: Multiple talkers and multiple listeners - Ethernet interconnection
  • - (6/10/2011) - Methods of measurement of the suppression characteristics of passive EMC filtering devices

See for additional information.

EU: NEW ETSI STANDARDS RECENTLY RELEASED

This is a shortened list of the new ETSI standards published during the past month:

  • - (May 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Level Probing Radar (LPR) equipment operating in the frequency ranges 6 GHz to 8,5 GHz, 24,05 GHz to 26,5 GHz, 57 GHz to 64 GHz, 75 GHz to 85 GHz; Part 2: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (May 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Level Probing Radar (LPR) equipment operating in the frequency ranges 6 GHz to 8,5 GHz, 24,05 GHz to 26,5 GHz, 57 GHz to 64 GHz, 75 GHz to 85 GHz; Part 1: Technical characteristics and test methods
  • - (May 2011) - Radio Frequency Identification (RFID); Coordinated ESO response to Phase 1 of EU Mandate M436
  • - (May 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Transmitting equipment for the digital television broadcast service, Terrestrial (DVB-T); Part 2: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • - (May 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Transmitting equipment for terrestrial mobile TV to provide multimedia multicast service; Part 1: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive, Common requirements
  • - (May 2011) - Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Transmitting equipment for terrestrial mobile TV to provide multimedia multicast service; Part 2: Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive, Test Arrangements for transmitters utilizing OFDM technology
  • - (May 2011) - Broadband Wireless Access Systems (BWA) in the 3,400 MHz to 3,800 MHz frequency band; Base Stations; Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive

See for additional information。

US: FCC PROPOSES TO EASE RADAR RULES

On May 25, 2011, the FCC Issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPR) proposing to modify Sections 15.35 and 15.253 of its rules to enable enhanced vehicular radar technologies in the 76-77 GHz band to improve collision avoidance and driver safety. Vehicular radars can determine the exact distance and relative speed of objects in front of, beside, or behind a car to improve the driver’s ability to perceive objects under bad visibility conditions or objects that are in blind spots.  Some examples of vehicular radar systems include collision warning and mitigation systems, blind spot detection systems, lane change assist and parking aid systems.  The FCC proposed to eliminate the existing requirement that vehicular radars decrease power when the vehicle on which the radar is mounted is stopped, or not in motion, and to expand the authorization for unlicensed 76-77 GHz band radars to allow their use in fixed infrastructure systems.  The FCC’s intent is that modifications to the rules should provide more efficient use of spectrum, and enable the automotive and fixed radar application industries to develop enhanced safety measures for drivers and the general public.

斗地主达人The FCC seeks comment on whether it should allow unlicensed fixed radar applications to operate within the 76-77 GHz band, and on the appropriateness of the proposed power levels。  The FCC also seeks comment on whether there is a need to limit fixed radar applications to specific locations, such as airports and/or locations where they are not aimed at publicly accessible or if some alternative criteria would be more appropriate。  Additionally, the FCC seeks comment on whether specific technical requirements are necessary to allow co-existence of fixed and vehicular radars in the 76-77 GHz band (e。g。, antenna height, operational frequency or power limits), and if there should be a requirement for fixed or vehicular radars to comply with a standard such as the ETSI EN 301 91。

CANADA: DGPS LICENSING PROCEDURE RELEASED

On May 31st, 2011, Industry Canada released . The general guidelines state that all DGPS radio station authorizations are to be issued on a shared, no-interference, no-protection basis to other licensed radio users and frequencies available for DGPS are only to be used for the transmission of differential correction information. Accessorial applications (i.e. guidance systems, automatic vehicle location, etc.) must be accommodated by other means.

The table below specifies frequencies that may be used for DGPS and applicable operating conditions:

Note: low power is considered to be an effective radiated power (ERP) of 5 W or less and high power is considered be an ERP of up to 30 W。

CANADA: NEW ISSUE OF RSS-119

On June 6, 2011, Industry Canada released , which sets out the requirements for radio transmitters and receivers for the land mobile and fixed services in bands allocated within the 27.41 MHz to 960 MHz range.

The new issue was updated to provide requirements for equipment with a 25 kHz channel spacing and an occupied bandwidth greater than 20 kHz operating in the frequency bands 406。1-430 MHz, 450-470 MHz, 806-821/851-866 MHz and 821-824/866-869 MHz。

 

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